Mask$ and Dis-guise$

Time Ghost1164412746
Confusion1164412746
Prince of Peace1167123564
Kyle C Grant1164415455
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Entirety1164410046
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Mask4486428
Werewolf1074410937
Mask Up81188136
Witch63277227
China Maiden815421663
Phony Bologna1446318045
Made in China815421663
Phone ix91469826
Biden Time814516254
Phoenix91469826
Tower81275427
Route 6691376841
Twin66214224
Kyle Baldwin1184617962
Hell on Earth1185517953
The Matrix1184612553
Sadie Dunhill1185520671
Hill Valley1184615253
Twin Pines1294811451
Electricity1295716869
Explosion1294811442

https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=guise+

Geometry1084510836
Freemasonic1085418963

disguise (n.)

c. 1400, “strange style of dress” (especially one meant to deceive), from disguise (v.). Meaning “false or misleading appearance, something that serves or is intended for concealment of identity” is from 1630s. Disguisement in this sense is from 1570s but now is disused.Related entries & more 6

undisguised (adj.)c. 1500, in reference to things, from un- (1) “not” + past participle of disguise (v.). Of persons, attested from 1670s.Related entries & more 

disguise (v.)

c. 1300, “conceal the personal identity of by changes of guise or usual appearance, with intent to deceive,” from Old French desguiser “disguise, change one’s appearance” (11c., Modern French déguiser), from des- “away, off” (see dis-) + guise “style, appearance,” which is from Germanic (see guise).

From mid-14c. as “conceal or cover up the original character of by a counterfeit form or appearance.” Originally primarily “to put out of one’s usual manner” (of dress, etc.), “change one’s appearance;” a sense preserved in phrase disguised with liquor (1560s) “being changed in behavior by intoxication.”

It is most absurdly said, in popular language, of any man, that he is disguised in liquor; for, on the contrary, most men are disguised by sobriety. [Thomas De Quincey, “Confessions of an English Opium-Eater,” 1856]

Eternity1164410046
George McFly1166218146

Related: Disguiseddisguising.Related entries & more

 travesty (n.)1670s, “literary burlesque of a serious work,” from adjective meaning “dressed so as to be made ridiculous, parodied, burlesqued” (1660s), from French travesti “dressed in disguise,” past participle of travestir “to disguise” (1590s), from Italian travestire “to disguise,” from Latin trans “across, beyond; over” (see trans-) + vestire “to clothe” (from PIE *wes- (2) “to clothe,” extended form of root *eu- “to dress”).Related entries & more

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9:413131313
Eight49318623
Forty Two142437438
Nine42246621
Jake2798127
Jake Epping944917650

 disfigure (v.)

late 14c., “mar the external figure of, impair the beauty, symmetry, or excellence of,” also “transform the appearance of, disguise,” from Old French desfigurer “disfigure, alter, disguise, destroy,” from Medieval Latin diffigurare, from assimilated form of Latin dis- (see dis-) + figurare “to form, shape,” from figura “a shape, form, figure” (from PIE root *dheigh- “to form, build”). Related: Disfigureddisfiguring; disfiguration.Related entries & more 

Doppler864110331
Helga332410221
Hell37197117
W heel53268219
Say Turn118287144
Vista71176437
Saturn93216942
Vishnu93306933
Die18186318
Big18186318
The O48216015
Neo34164711
The Neo67319523
The OA49228623
2 Seasons94229945
Sixteen Episodes1887121782
OA1673811
Clarity883410147
It’s TIME to Save the World28293285123
Eighty Eight Miles Per Hour282138339114
Vision88347438
Dignity884310138
Trump88254729

frankly (adv.)“in an unreserved manner, without concealment or disguise,” 1530s, from frank (adj.) + -ly (2).Related entries & more human (n.)“a human being,” 1530s, from human (adj.). Its Old English equivalent, guma, survives only in disguise in bridegroom.Related entries & more 

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Bury66214224
Inter66306933
Net39124215
Web30125115
Charlton913712544
Five Twenty Nine1917418770
Two Hundred and Fifty Nine259115335110
Transmission Complete25988281119
Forty Six136468044
Magical462814344
Twenty Seven1724612553
27 Club47207934
Code27188118
Red27185418
JFK2795418
Dallas, Texas1182817971
3/115555
11/35555
Leland Palmer1135021167
The Answer1134113049
Kyle Grant1134113049
Tom Baldwin1134115758
World72276327
Whole63277218
Hollywood1294811433

explicitly (adv.)

“plainly, without disguise or reservation of meaning, not by inference; clearly, unmistakably,” 1630s, from explicit + -ly (2). Opposed to implicitly.Related entries & more occultation (n.)

early 15c., occultacioun, “disguise or concealment of identity,” from Latin occultationem (nominative occultatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of occultare “to hide, conceal,” frequentative of occulere “to cover over, conceal” (see occult).Related entries & more

Forty Five1265411745
Denial452711736
Nile40226823
Delta42159330
Isidore794311047
D44235
Ben21126015

 dissemble (v.)

early 15c., dissemblen, “assume a false seeming; conceal real facts, motives, intentions, etc.; mask the truth about oneself,” from Old French dessembler, from Latin dissimulare “make unlike, conceal, disguise,” from dis- “completely” (see dis-) + simulare “to make like, imitate, copy, represent,” from stem of similis “like, resembling, of the same kind” (see similar). Related: Dissembleddissembling.

Word or PhraseEnglish OrdinalFull ReductionReverse OrdinalReverse Full Reduction
Spirit of 761256211763
3:811111111
Chann el573013233
TV4261212
WSBK55105326
Death38209725
Change382912425
Fire38297025
Alpha38209725
Om Mega542710827
Massachusetts1683318384
Ninety87337530
Omega41239422
Ninety Nine1295714151
Orion71356428
Jupiter99369045
Deity63277227
Zeus71173719
Data2688228
Dei18186318
Date30127824
Day30125115
Freya55288026
Friday63369936
Fridaya the 13th1296620368

Form altered apparently by influence of resemble, Old French resembler. Earlier was Middle English dissimule, from Old French dissimuler. Transitive meaning “make unlike, disguise” is from c. 1500; that of “give a false impression of” is from 1510s.

To dissemble is to pretend that a thing which is is not: as, to dissemble one’s real sentiments. To simulate is to pretend that a thing which is not is: as, to simulate friendship. To dissimulate is to hide the reality or truth of something under a diverse contrary appearance: as, to dissimulate one’s poverty by ostentation. To disguise is to put under a false guise, to keep a thing from being recognized by giving it a false appearance: as I cannot disguise from myself the fact. [Century Dictionary]

Related entries & more 

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Covid 1963369238
Code Red543613536
Covid53268228
Touch Film1074413646
Illuminati1204815069
Zeitgeist1204812351
Masonic742911543
Ghost69246621
Time47206125
Time Traveler1485817677
8+1514141414
19:5823232323
19:8523232323
88 Miles Per Hour1758518182
88 Masonic Home Road1698826897
Class of 94883412755
David Bowie944917659
Dale Cooper944917650
Spirit of Seventy Six27494212104
Flight 815764911442
Marathon Man1184617962
Mid26175519
God26175510
Gravity102398742
Grave53268228
Move UpEnglish OrdinalMove Down
abcdefghijklm
12345678910111213
nopqrstuvwxyz
14151617181920212223242526
http://www.gematrinator.com/calculator/index.php
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One Hundred1085416245
Taurus100196244
To Ra54185427
Torah62267328
Towers100286235
110 Stories107358650
God of the Bi Ble1106524161
Bull47116125
Mandible603315648
Forty Eight1336113747
Mania38209734
Max38114316
Man28105317
Beta28108026
Bob19106217
Son48123315
Jah19106217
Sun5492718
Ra19103517
19:5419191919
Fifty Four1265411745
Base Ball541816254
162 Games54279936
19:5318181818
62 Games53269835

person (n.)

c. 1200, persoun, “an individual, a human being,” from Old French persone “human being, anyone, person” (12c., Modern French personne) and directly from Latin persona “human being, person, personage; a part in a drama, assumed character,” originally “a mask, a false face,” such as those of wood or clay, covering the whole head, worn by the actors in later Roman theater. OED offers the general 19c. explanation of persona as “related to” Latin personare “to sound through” (i.e. the mask as something spoken through and perhaps amplifying the voice), “but the long o makes a difficulty ….” Klein and Barnhart say it is possibly borrowed from Etruscan phersu “mask.” De Vaan has no entry for it.

From mid-13c. as “one of the persons of the Trinity,” a theological use in Church Latin of the classical word. Meanings “one’s physical being, the living body; external appearance” are from late 14c. In grammar, “one of the relations which a subject may have to a verb,” from 1510s. In legal use, “corporate body or corporation other than the state and having rights and duties before the law,” 15c., short for person aggregate (c. 1400), person corporate (mid-15c.).

The use of -person to replace -man in compounds for the sake of gender neutrality or to avoid allegations of sexism is recorded by 1971 (in chairperson). In person “by bodily presence” is from 1560s. Person-to-person is attested by 1919, originally of telephone calls.

Y25722
Honk \48216015
Horn55285317
Ache Horn724514436
A Corn51248430
Cap Ra Corn894415455
Capricorn975214656
December553716144
Prison91377135
Christmas1103813361
Krishna803510946
Docked Ore804416346
Dr.22133214
Zeus71173719
Dark Side713514555
Black Moon863215749
Virus89264637
Quarantine1204815060
Origin and meaning of person

Entries related to Person

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guiser (n.)“masquerader, mummer, one who goes from house to house, whimsically disguised, and making diversion with songs and antics, usually at Christmas,” late 15c., agent noun from guise.Related entries & more guise (n.)late 13c., “style or fashion of attire,” from Old French guise “manner, fashion, way,” from Frankish *wisa or some similar Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *wison “appearance, form, manner,” from *wissaz (source also of Old High German wisa “manner, wise”), from PIE root *weid- “to see.” Sense of “assumed appearance” is from 1660s, from earlier meaning “mask, disguise” (c. 1500).Related entries & more 

geezer (n.)

derisive word for an old man, 1885, according to OED a variant of obsolete Cockney guiser “mummer, one wearing a mask or costume as part of a performance” (late 15c.; see guise). If so, the original notion was “one who went about in disguise,” hence “odd man,” hence “old man” (it still commonly is qualified by old).Related entries & more 

disguise (v.)

c. 1300, “conceal the personal identity of by changes of guise or usual appearance, with intent to deceive,” from Old French desguiser “disguise, change one’s appearance” (11c., Modern French déguiser), from des- “away, off” (see dis-) + guise “style, appearance,” which is from Germanic (see guise).

From mid-14c. as “conceal or cover up the original character of by a counterfeit form or appearance.” Originally primarily “to put out of one’s usual manner” (of dress, etc.), “change one’s appearance;” a sense preserved in phrase disguised with liquor (1560s) “being changed in behavior by intoxication.”

It is most absurdly said, in popular language, of any man, that he is disguised in liquor; for, on the contrary, most men are disguised by sobriety. [Thomas De Quincey, “Confessions of an English Opium-Eater,” 1856]

Related: Disguiseddisguising.Related entries & more 

*weid- Proto-Indo-European root meaning “to see.”

It forms all or part of: adviceadvisebelvedereclairvoyantdeja vuDruideideticeidolonenvyevidentguideguidonguiseguy (n.1) “small rope, chain, wire;” GwendolynHadeshistoryideaideo-idolidyllimprovisationimproviseinterviewinvidiouskaleidoscope-oidpenguinpolyhistorprevisionprovideprovidenceprudentpurveypurviewreviewreviseRig Vedastory (n.1) “connected account or narration of some happening;” supervisesurveytwitunwittingVedavideviewvisavisagevisionvisitvisorvistavoyeurwise (adj.) “learned, sagacious, cunning;” wise (n.) “way of proceeding, manner;” wisdomwiseacrewit (n.) “mental capacity;” wit (v.) “to know;” witenagemotwittingwot.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit veda “I know;” Avestan vaeda “I know;” Greek oida, Doric woida “I know,” idein “to see;” Old Irish fis “vision,” find “white,” i.e. “clearly seen,” fiuss “knowledge;” Welsh gwyn, Gaulish vindos, Breton gwenn “white;” Gothic, Old Swedish, Old English witan “to know;” Gothic weitan “to see;” English wise, German wissen “to know;” Lithuanian vysti “to see;” Bulgarian vidya “I see;” Polish widzieć “to see,” wiedzieć “to know;” Russian videt’ “to see,” vest’ “news,” Old Russian vedat’ “to know.”Related entries & more

slum (v.)

“visit slums of a city,” especially for diversion or amusement, often under guise of philanthropy, 1884, from slum (n.). A pastime popularized by East End novels. Earlier it meant “to visit slums for disreputable purposes or in search of vice” (1860). Related: Slumming.Related entries & more 

86’d18183719
The33154812
Fenway Park1204815051
Park46196226
Fenway74298825
Field36279927
Game26178219
Baseball541816254
Eighty Six1265411745
19:8624242424
Nineteen864113040
Say 1046103719
1:910101010
19:6319191919

allegory (n.)

“figurative treatment of an unmentioned subject under the guise of another similar to it in some way,” late 14c., from Old French allegorie (12c.), from Latin allegoria, from Greek allegoria “figurative language, description of one thing under the image of another,” literally “a speaking about something else,” from allos “another, different” (from PIE root *al- (1) “beyond”) + agoreuein “speak openly, speak in the assembly,” from agora “assembly” (see agora). Related: Allegorist.Related entries & more

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One Twenty1414210239
Donna Grant1084516254
Initiation1205715069
Jack Shepherd1085421663
Dharma Initiative16382269107
Gordon Cole1085416245
The Sleeper1135015749
Eighty One1085413536
Mount Weather1635516162
Fire Walk With Me1637321580
Settle81188136
Twin Peaks1183712553
Set4483719
With Me78338430
Satan55108035
Walk47116125
Part55195326
Five42246621
Pair of El824613444
Sixty Three1535411754
Parallel773213949
El-even63279927
9/1111111111

 proverb (n.)

c. 1300, in boke of Prouerbyys, the Old Testament work, from Old French proverbe (12c.) and directly from Latin proverbium “a common saying, old adage, maxim,” literally “words put forward,” from pro “forth” (from PIE root *per- (1) “forward”) + verbum “word” (see verb). Hence, in the Scriptural sense, “an enigmatical utterance; a mysterious or oracular saying that requires interpretation.”

Used generally from c. 1300 in reference to native sayings, “short pithy sentence, often repeated colloquially, expressing a well-known truth or a common fact ascertained by experience or observation; a popular saying which briefly and forcibly expresses some practical precept; an adage; a wise saw: often set forth in the guise of metaphor and in the form of rime, and sometimes alliterative” [Century Dictionary].

By late 14c. as “byword, reproach, object of scorn.” The Book of Proverbs in Old English was cwidboc, from cwide “speech, saying, proverb, homily,” related to cwiddian “to talk, speak, say, discuss;” cwiddung “speech, saying, report.”Related entries & more

Word or PhraseEnglish OrdinalFull ReductionReverse OrdinalReverse Full Reduction
Double592310331
Doppelganger1206620451
S19188
Oven56205216
C33246
Mask4486428
Hidden443511828
Coven59237622
Occult74208834
Govern81368127
Lucifer743811543
Government1335213747
Jesus74116134
Everything1336113747
Prince of Peace1167123564
One Thirteen1336116456
Kyle C Grant1164415455
Kyle Grant1134113049
Time Ghost1164412746
Clock Tower1254414555
Clock44179128
Game Over864113040
Fourteen1044111240
10:45555
Ten Four99369036

 dissemble (v.)

early 15c., dissemblen, “assume a false seeming; conceal real facts, motives, intentions, etc.; mask the truth about oneself,” from Old French dessembler, from Latin dissimulare “make unlike, conceal, disguise,” from dis- “completely” (see dis-) + simulare “to make like, imitate, copy, represent,” from stem of similis “like, resembling, of the same kind” (see similar). Related: Dissembleddissembling.

Form altered apparently by influence of resemble, Old French resembler. Earlier was Middle English dissimule, from Old French dissimuler. Transitive meaning “make unlike, disguise” is from c. 1500; that of “give a false impression of” is from 1510s.

To dissemble is to pretend that a thing which is is not: as, to dissemble one’s real sentiments. To simulate is to pretend that a thing which is not is: as, to simulate friendship. To dissimulate is to hide the reality or truth of something under a diverse contrary appearance: as, to dissimulate one’s poverty by ostentation. To disguise is to put under a false guise, to keep a thing from being recognized by giving it a false appearance: as I cannot disguise from myself the fact. [Century Dictionary]

Related entries & more 

Beguine (n.)late 15c., from French béguine (13c.), Medieval Latin beguina, “a member of a women’s spiritual order professing poverty and self-denial, founded c.1180 in Liege in the Low Countries.” They are said to take their name from the surname of Lambert le Bègue “Lambert the Stammerer,” a Liege priest who was instrumental in their founding, and it’s likely the word was pejorative at first. French bègue is of unknown origin. Related: Beguinage.

The women’s order, though sometimes persecuted, generally preserved its good reputation, but it quickly drew imposters who did not; nonetheless it eventually was condemned as heretical. A male order, called Beghards founded communities by the 1220s in imitation of them, but they soon degenerated (compare Old French beguin “(male) Beguin,” also “hypocrite”) and wandered begging in the guise of religion; they likely were the source of the words beg and beggar, though there is disagreement over whether Beghard produced Middle Dutch beggaert “mendicant” or was produced by it. The male order was condemned by the Church early 14c. and vanished by mid-16c.

Cole Porter’s “Begin the Beguine” (1935) refers to a kind of popular dance of West Indian origin, from French colloquial béguin “an infatuation, boyfriend, girlfriend,” earlier “child’s bonnet,” and before that “nun’s headdress” (14c.), from Middle Dutch beggaert, ultimately the same word as the above. Compare English biggin “child’s cap” (1520s), from the French word.Related entries & more 

dis (v.)

also diss, slang, by 1980, shortening of disrespect or dismiss, originally in African-American vernacular, popularized by hip hop. Related: Disseddissing. Earlier it was short for distribute in late 19c. printers’ slang and for disconnected in the telephone-line sense, and in this sense it was given a slang figurative extension as “weak in the head” (1925).Related entries & more 

Dis Roman underworld god, from Latin Dis, contracted from dives “rich,” which is related to divus “divine, god” (from PIE root *dyeu- “to shine,” in derivatives “sky, heaven, god”), hence “favored by god.” Compare Pluto and Old Church Slavonic bogatu “rich,” from bogu “god.”Related entries & more

 dis- 

word-forming element of Latin origin meaning 1. “lack of, not” (as in dishonest); 2. “opposite of, do the opposite of” (as in disallow); 3. “apart, away” (as in discard), from Old French des- or directly from Latin dis- “apart, asunder, in a different direction, between,” figuratively “not, un-,” also “exceedingly, utterly.” Assimilated as dif- before -f- and to di- before most voiced consonants.

The Latin prefix is from PIE *dis- “apart, asunder” (source also of Old English te-, Old Saxon ti-, Old High German ze-, German zer-). The PIE root is a secondary form of *dwis- and thus is related to Latin bis “twice” (originally *dvis) and to duo, on notion of “two ways, in twain” (hence “apart, asunder”).

In classical Latin, dis- paralleled de- and had much the same meaning, but in Late Latin dis- came to be the favored form and this passed into Old French as des-, the form used for compound words formed in Old French, where it increasingly had a privative sense (“not”). In English, many of these words eventually were altered back to dis-, while in French many have been altered back to de-. The usual confusion prevails.

As a living prefix in English, it reverses or negatives what it is affixed to. Sometimes, as in Italian, it is reduced to s- (as in spendsplaysportsdain for disdain, and the surnames Spencer and Spence).Related entries & more 

disinterest (n.)

“impartiality,” 1650s, from dis- “opposite of” + interest (n.).Related entries & more 

discourteous (adj.)

“uncivil, rude,” 1570s; see dis- + courteous. Related: Discourteously; discourteousness.Related entries & more 

disharmony (n.)

“discord, incongruity, want of harmony,” c. 1600; see dis- + harmony.Related entries & more

 disrespect (n.)

“want of respect or reverence, incivility,” 1630s, from dis- + respect (n.).Related entries & more 

disunity (n.)

“want of unity, state of separation; absence of accord,” 1630s, from dis- + unity.Related entries & more

20:204444
19:5520202020
Fifty Five1085413545
20+215555
Forty Two142437438
Twenty One1414210239
Moon57215115
Room61254720
2:3712121212
Media322310331
Christ77328540
1+67777
3+47777
Dark34167429
Biden342510129
On e34164711
Om2810268
Sol46103517
O156123
O Rion71356428
O Mega41239422
O Sirius110387952
Apostrophe1335213747
Osiris89357346
Catastrophe1264517163

 disincentive (n.)

“a source of discouragement,” 1946; see dis- + incentive (n.).Related entries & more 

disrespectful (adj.)

“showing disrespect, wanting in respect; irreverent, uncivil,” 1670s; see dis- + respectful. Related: Disrespectfully; disrespectfulness.Related entries & more 

fourth letter of the Roman alphabet, from Greek delta, from Phoenician and Hebrew daleth, pausal form of deleth “door,” so called from its shape. The form of the modern letter is the Greek delta (Δ) with one angle rounded. As the sign for “500” in Roman numerals, it is said to be half of CIƆ, which was an early form of M, the sign for “1,000.” 3-D for “three-dimensional” is attested from 1952.Related entries & more -derm word-forming element meaning “skin,” from Greek derma “skin, hide, leather,” from PIE root *der- “to split, flay, peel,” with derivatives referring to skin and leather.Related entries & more 

Eighty Nine1166215446
Sequence893512737
Fibonacci624418155
Forty Four144549945
Clock44179128
Mask4486428
Ai10104417
Adonai442611837
Kyle53175519
X+Y491355
7+613131313
Magazine764014041
Biden TIME814516254
Mask Up81188136
Tower81275427
One Hundred and Ten Stories271109350125
Saturnalia1163515473
Santa55108035
Magical462814344
Say 1046103719
Up3710178
Geometry1084510836
Freemasonic1085418963
Time Ghost1164412746
Confusion1164412746
Word or PhraseEnglish OrdinalFull ReductionReverse OrdinalReverse Full Reduction
Prince of Peace1167123564

-dom 

abstract suffix of state, from Old English dom “statute, judgment” (see doom (n.)). Originally an independent word, but already active as a suffix in Old English (as in freodomwisdom). Cognate with German -tum (Old High German tuom). “Jurisdiction,” hence “province, state, condition, quality.”Related entries & more

 de- 

active word-forming element in English and in many verbs inherited from French and Latin, from Latin de “down, down from, from, off; concerning” (see de), also used as a prefix in Latin, usually meaning “down, off, away, from among, down from,” but also “down to the bottom, totally” hence “completely” (intensive or completive), which is its sense in many English words.

As a Latin prefix it also had the function of undoing or reversing a verb’s action, and hence it came to be used as a pure privative — “not, do the opposite of, undo” — which is its primary function as a living prefix in English, as in defrost (1895), defuse (1943), de-escalate (1964), etc. In some cases, a reduced form of dis-.Related entries & more deca- before a vowel, dec-, word-forming element meaning “ten,” from Latinized combining form of Greek deka “ten” (from PIE root *dekm- “ten”). In the metric system, “multiplied by ten;” while deci- means “divided by ten.”Related entries & more

 deci- 

in the metric system, word-forming element denoting one-tenth of the standard unit of measure, 1801, from French deci-, taken arbitrarily from Latin decimus “tenth,” from decem “ten” (from PIE root *dekm- “ten”).Related entries & more demi- 

word-forming element meaning “half, half-sized, partial,” used in English from mid-14c., especially in technical terms from French, from Old French demi “half” (12c.), from Late Latin dimedius, from Latin dimidius “half, one-half,” which contains the elements dis- “apart” (see dis-) + medius “in the middle, between; from the middle,” as a noun “the middle;” from PIE root *medhyo- “middle.” Formerly also demy-, and in early use often written as a separate word.Related entries & more

 dendro- 

word-forming element meaning “tree,” from Greek dendron “tree,” sometimes especially “fruit tree” (as opposed to hylē “timber”), from PIE *der-drew-, from root *deru- “to be firm, solid, steadfast,” also forming words for “wood, tree.”Related entries & more deoxy- 

also desoxy-, word-forming element used to make chemical names for compounds which contain fewer oxygen atoms than other compounds, from de- + first two syllables of oxygen.Related entries & more

 dermat- 

word-forming element meaning “of or pertaining to skin,” from Greek dermat-, from derma “(flayed) skin, leather,” from PIE root *der- “to split, flay, peel,” with derivatives referring to skin and leather. The shortened form derm- was used from mid-19c. but is considered incorrect.Related entries & more 

Word or PhraseEnglish OrdinalFull ReductionReverse OrdinalReverse Full Reduction
The Great Re-Set1516120074
Jesus Christ1514314674
13 Reasons Why1515212755
CIA13136823
Central Intelligence18889325109
Such a Little Thing1887124491
Crown of Thorns1887116364
The Coronavirus1887119082
18:8623232323
Eighty Sixed1356316254
Eighteen734614335
Saturnalia1163515473
Santa55108035
Magical462814344
Say 1046103719
Up3710178
Geometry1084510836
Freemasonic1085418963
Time Ghost1164412746
Confusion1164412746

About kylegrant76

Eye am that Eye am
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