I Ra

(5 letters, 1 word)”crown” = 26 (Reverse Full Reduction)

crown26
69344
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(3 letters, 1 word)”ira” = 28 (English Ordinal)

ira28
9181

(5 letters, 1 word)”crown” = 28 (Full Reduction)

crown28
39655

What’s that you say about big bad RUSSIA interfering/ meddling in your precious, corporate-controlled, fraudulent, anti-democratic ‘el-ection$?’ The problem is the ignorant population of passive, obedient, fear-based, creature-comfort-worshipping, system-dependent drones who believe in the powers that believe they be. The powers that believe they be would cease to be if the people stopped believing in these powers and their phony, Phoeni(cia)n political system of Police/ Policy/ Authoritarianism/ Dictator-$hip/ Fascism/ Govern-mental/ State Mind Control/ Brainwashing of the M-asses.

US Interfered In Foreign Elections 81 Times In 54 Years”

December 26, 2016Edmondo BurrNewsUS0 Comments

elections

“The U.S. has accused Russia of having “interfered” in the 2016 presidential election without providing any hard evidence.

Yet, the US establishment who mainly backed Hillary Clinton against Donald Trump have interfered in presidential elections of other countries.”

3 letters, 1 word)”era” = 21 (Reverse Full Reduction)

era21
498
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In Europe the Democratic Party would be considered what it truly is: Right Wing. Corp-orate.
De-voted to Bi-den = NOT Progressive

De-voted to Bi-den/ Harris = Re-gressive

(NO better, NO less Evil than being De-voted to T-rump/ P-ence OR any other Wall Street Puppet, Slimy, Corrupt to the Core Politician of the Plutocracy, Mockery of Democracy)

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(12 letters, 2 words)”america snake” = 100 (English Ordinal)

america50snake50100
11351893119141115

(16 letters, 4 words)”eating its own tail” = 99 (Reverse Full Reduction)

eating34its24own11tail3099
4879429783447896

Kyle C. Grant: Persona-lity = The Mask/ Facade/ Face/ False Front/ Covering/ Shell/ Sur-F-ace/ Shallow/ Ego/ Masquerade . . . A human(e) being is not merely a front, but a front and back. www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Person

(10 letters, 3 words)”kyle c grant” = 116 (English Ordinal)

kyle53c3grant60116
1125125371811420

(13 letters, 3 words)”prince of peace” = 116 (English Ordinal)

prince65of21peace30116
161891435156165135

(10 letters, 1 word)”saturnalia” = 116 (English Ordinal)

saturnalia116
1912021181411291

(7 letters, 1 word)”kingdom” = 116 (Reverse Ordinal)

kingdom116
16181320231214
Origin and meaning of person

(4 letters, 1 word)”game” = 26 (English Ordinal)

game26
71135

(3 letters, 1 word)”god” = 26 (English Ordinal)

god26
7154

(7 letters, 1 word)”serapis” = 33 (Full Reduction)

serapis33
1591791

Ira

masc. proper name, from Hebrew, literally “watchful,” from stem of ur “to awake, to rouse oneself.”

Dictionary entries near Ira

ipse dixit

ipseity

ipsilateral

ipso facto

ir

Ira

iracund

Iran

Iranian

Iraq

irascibility

Ra

Ra

Ra or Re is the ancient Egyptian deity of the sun. By the Fifth Dynasty in the 25th and 24th centuries BC, he had become one of the most important gods in ancient Egyptian religion, identified primarily with the noon sun. Ra was believed to rule in all parts of the created world: the sky, the Earth, and the underworld. He was the god of the sun, order, kings, and the sky.

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Ra

“hawk-headed sovereign sun god of Egyptian mythology,” from Egyptian R “sun, day.”

Dictionary entries near Ra

R

R.A.F.

R.E.M.

R.O.T.C.

R.S.V.P.

Ra

Rabat

rabbet

rabbi

rabbinate

rabbinical

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(1 letter, 1 word)”s” = 19 (English Ordinal)

s19
19

2 letters, 1 word)”Ra” = 19 (English Ordinal)

Ra19
181

(3 letters, 1 word)“jah” = 19 (English Ordinal)

jah19
1018
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(0 letter, 1 word)”19” = 10 (English Ordinal)

1910
19
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(0 letter, 1 word)“10” = 1 (English Ordinal)

101
10

(2 letters, 1 word)”ai” = 10 (English Ordinal)

ai10
19
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(0 letter, 1 word)”1918″ = 19 (English Ordinal)

191819
1918
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4 letters, 1 word)”iran” = 42 (English Ordinal)

iran42
918114
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It seems that Douglas Adams was right after all: the answer to Life, the Universe and everything, is 42. Cambridge astronomers have found that 42 is the value of an essential scientific constant – one which determines the age of the universe.

Yes, the answer to the universe really is 42 | The Independent

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/yes-the-answer-to-the-universe-really-is-42-13512

Iran

country name, from Persian Iran, from Middle Persian Ērān “(land) of the Iranians,” genitive plural of ēr- “an Iranian,” from Old Iranian *arya- (Old Persian ariya-, Avestan airya-) “Iranian”, from Indo-Iranian *arya- or *ārya-, a self-designation, perhaps meaning “compatriot” (see Aryan).

In English it began to be used 1760s, by orientalists and linguists (Alexander Dow, William Jones), in historical contexts, and usually with a footnote identifying it with modern Persia; as recently as 1903 “Century Dictionary” defined it as “the ancient name of the region lying between Kurdistan and India.” In 1935 the government of Reza Shah Pahlavi requested governments with which it had diplomatic relations to call his country Iran, after the indigenous name, rather than the Greek-derived Persia.

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(6 letters, 1 word)
radius” = 
72
 (English Ordinal)
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(3 letters, 1 word)
ray” = 
44
 (English Ordinal)

Aryan

c. 1600, as a term in classical history, from Latin ArianusAriana, from Greek AriaAreia, names applied in classical times to the eastern part of ancient Persia and to its inhabitants. Ancient Persians used the name in reference to themselves (Old Persian ariya-), hence Iran. Ultimately from Sanskrit arya- “compatriot;” in later language “noble, of good family.”

Also the name Sanskrit-speaking invaders of India gave themselves in the ancient texts. Thus it was the word early 19c. European philologists (Friedrich Schlegel, 1819, who linked it with German Ehre “honor”) applied to the ancient people we now call Indo-Europeans, suspecting that this is what they called themselves. This use is attested in English from 1851. In German from 1845 it was specifically contrasted to Semitic (Lassen).

German philologist Max Müller (1823-1900) popularized Aryan in his writings on comparative linguistics, recommending it as the name (replacing Indo-EuropeanIndo-GermanicCaucasianJaphetic) for the group of related, inflected languages connected with these peoples, mostly found in Europe but also including Sanskrit and Persian. The spelling Arian was used in this sense from 1839 (and is more philologically correct), but it caused confusion with Arian, the term in ecclesiastical history.

The terms for God, for house, for father, mother, son, daughter, for dog and cow, for heart and tears, for axe and tree, identical in all the Indo-European idioms, are like the watchwords of soldiers. We challenge the seeming stranger; and whether he answer with the lips of a Greek, a German, or an Indian, we recognize him as one of ourselves. [Müller, “History of Ancient Sanskrit Literature,” 1859]

Aryan was gradually replaced in comparative linguistics c. 1900 by Indo-European, except when used to distinguish Indo-European languages of India from non-Indo-European ones. From the 1920s Aryan began to be used in Nazi ideology to mean “member of a Caucasian Gentile race of Nordic type.” As an ethnic designation, however, it is properly limited to Indo-Iranians (most justly to the latter) and has fallen from general academic use since the Nazis adopted it.

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(3 letters, 1 word)
ray” = 
19
 (Reverse Full Reduction)

(5 letters, 1 word)”aryan” = 23 (Full Reduction)

aryan23
19715

(4 letters, 1 word)”euro” = 23 (Full Reduction)

euro23
5396
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Indo-European

1814, coined by English polymath Thomas Young (1773-1829) and first used in an article in the “Quarterly Review,” from Indo- + European. “Common to India and Europe,” specifically in reference to the group of related languages and to the race or races characterized by their use. William Dwight Whitney (“The Life and Growth of Language,” 1875) credits its widespread use to Franz Bopp. 

The alternative Indo-Germanic (1835) was coined in German in 1823 (indogermanisch), based on the two peoples then thought to be at the extremes of the geographic area covered by the languages, but this was before Celtic was realized also to be an Indo-European language. After this was proved, many German scholars switched to Indo-European as more accurate, but Indo-Germanic continued in use (popularized by the titles of major works) and the predominance of German scholarship in this field made it the popular term in England, too, through the 19c. See also Aryan and Japhetic.

Indo-Aryan (1850) seems to have been used only of the Aryans of India. Indo-European also was used in reference to trade between Europe and India or European colonial enterprises in India (1813).

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European

c. 1600 (adj.); 1630s (n.), from French Européen, from Latin Europaeus, from Greek Europaios “European,” from Europe (see Europe).

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(3 letters, 1 word)
flu” = 
42
 (Reverse Ordinal)

Europe

from Latin Europa “Europe,” from Greek Europe, which is of uncertain origin; as a geographic name first recorded in the Homeric hymn to Apollo (522 B.C.E. or earlier):

“Telphusa, here I am minded to make a glorious temple, an oracle for men, and hither they will always bring perfect hecatombs, both those who live in rich Peloponnesus and those of Europe and all the wave-washed isles, coming to seek oracles.”

Often explained as “broad face,” from eurys “wide” (see eury-) + ops “face,” literally “eye” (from PIE root *okw- “to see”). But also traditionally linked with Europa, Phoenician princess in Greek mythology. Klein (citing Heinrich Lewy) suggests a possible Semitic origin in Akkad. erebu “to go down, set” (in reference to the sun) which would parallel occident. Another suggestion along those lines is Phoenician ‘ereb “evening,” hence “west.”

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Proto-Indo-European (n.)

the hypothetical reconstructed ancestral language of the Indo-European family, by 1905. The time scale of the “language” itself is much debated, but the most recent date proposed for it is about 5,500 years ago. 

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Japhetic (adj.)

in reference to the presumed ancestral language of ancient Greek, Latin, and most of the modern European ones, 1730, from Biblical Japheth, a son of Noah, from whom the European peoples once were popularly supposed to have descended (as Middle Eastern Semitic from Shem; African Hamitic from Ham). Compare Aryan. Related: Japhetian (1752).

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(7 letters, 1 word)”semitic” = 33 (Full Reduction)

semitic33
1549293
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Semitic (adj.)

1797, denoting the language group that includes Hebrew, Arabic, Aramaic, Assyrian, etc.; 1826 as “of or pertaining to Semites,” from Medieval Latin Semiticus (source of Spanish semitico, French semitique, German semitisch), from Semita (see Semite). As a noun, as the name of a linguistic family, from 1813. In non-linguistic use, perhaps directly from German semitisch. In recent use often with the specific sense “Jewish,” but not historically so limited.

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Iraq

country name, 1920, from an Arabic name attested since 6c. for the region known in Greek as Mesopotamia; often said to be from Arabic `araqa, covering notions such as “perspiring, deeply rooted, well-watered,” which may reflect the desert Arabs’ impression of the lush river-land. But the name might be from, or influenced by, Sumerian Uruk (Biblical Erech), anciently a prominent city in what is now southern Iraq (from Sumerian uru “city”). Related: Iraqi (attested in English from 1777, in reference to regional Mesopotamian music or dialects).

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4 letters, 2 words)”ira q” = 27 (Full Reduction)

ira19q827
9918

(11 letters, 1 word)”mesopotamia” = 127 (English Ordinal)

mesopotamia127
135191516152011391

Mesopotamia

ancient name for the land that lies between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers north of Babylon (in modern Iraq), from Greek mesopotamia (khōra), literally “a country between two rivers,” from fem. of mesopotamos, from mesos “middle” (from PIE root *medhyo- “middle”) + potamos “river” (see potamo-).

In 19c. the word sometimes was used in the sense of “anything which gives irrational or inexplicable comfort to the hearer,” based on the story of the old woman who told her pastor that she “found great support in that comfortable word Mesopotamia” [“Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable,” 1870]. The place was Mespot (1917) to British soldiers serving there in World War I. Related: Mesopotamian.

Entries related to mesopotamia

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*medhyo-

Proto-Indo-European root meaning “middle.” Perhaps related to PIE root *me- (2) “to measure.”

It forms all or part of: amidintermediatemean (adj.2) “occupying a middle or intermediate place;” medalmedialmedianmediatemedievalmediocreMediterraneanmediummeridianmesicmesialmeso-mesonMesopotamiaMesozoicmezzaninemezzomezzotintmid (prep., adj.); middleMidgardmidriffmidstmidwifemilieumingemizzenmoietymullion.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit madhyah, Avestan madiya- “middle,” Greek mesos, Latin medius “in the middle, between; from the middle,” Gothic midjis, Old English midd “middle,” Old Church Slavonic medzu “between,” Armenian mej “middle.”

(7 letters, 1 word)”between” = 74 (English Ordinal)

between74
2520235514

(6 letters, 1 word)”middle” = 47 (English Ordinal)

middle47
13944125
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  • mediant
  • mediate
  • mediation
  • mediator
  • medieval
  • mediocre
  • mediterranean
  • medium
  • meridian
  • mesentery
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potamo-

word-forming element meaning “river,” from Greek potamos “river,” perhaps literally “rushing water,” from PIE root *pet- “to rush, to fly.”

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*pet

Also petə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning “to rush, to fly.” 

It forms all or part of: accipiterappetenceappetiteapterousapteryxarchaeopteryxasymptotecentripetalColeopteracompetecompetenteurypteridfeatherhelicopterhippopotamusHymenopteraimpetigoimpetuousimpetusiopterousLepidopteraornithopterpanachepannepen (n.1) “writing implement;” pennonperipeteiaperpetualperpetuitypetitionpetulancepetulantpinpinionpinnaclepinnatepinnipedpotamo-potamologypropitiationpropitiousptero-pterodactylptomaineptosisrepeatsymptom.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit pattram “wing, feather, leaf,” patara- “flying, fleeting;” Hittite pittar “wing;” Greek piptein “to fall,” potamos “river, rushing water,” pteron, pteryx “feather, wing,” ptilon “soft feathers, down, plume;” Latin petere “to attack, assail; seek, strive after; ask for, beg; demand, require,” penna “feather, wing;” Old Norse fjöðr, Old English feðer “feather;” Old Church Slavonic pero “feather;” Old Welsh eterin “bird.”

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  • centripetal
  • coleoptera
  • compete
  • competent
  • eurypterid
  • feather
  • helicopter
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  • hymenoptera
  • impeach
  • impetigo
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*okw-

Proto-Indo-European root meaning “to see.”

It forms all or part of: amblyopiaantiqueantleratrocityautopsybinoclebinocularbiopsycatoptricCyclopsdaisyenoptomancyeyeeyeletferocityhyperopiainoculateinveiglemonoclemonocularmyopianecropsyocularoculistoculusoeilladeogleophthalmo-opticopticianopticsoptometrypanopticpanopticonPeloponnesuspinochlepresbyopiaprosopopeiastereopticansynopsistriceratopsullagewall-eyedwindow.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit akshi “the eye; the number two,” Greek osse “(two) eyes,” opsis “a sight;” Old Church Slavonic oko, Lithuanian akis, Latin oculus, Greek okkos, Tocharian akek, Armenian akn “eye.”

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  • chromatopsy
  • cyclops
  • daisy
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Dictionary entries near *okw-

oke

Okie

Okinawa

Oklahoma

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okra

*okw-

-ol

-ola

Olaf

Olbers’ paradox

old

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Gayatri Mantra

Gayatri Mantra

The Gāyatrī Mantra, also known as the Sāvitri Mantra, is a highly revered mantra from the Rig Veda, dedicated to Savitr. Gāyatrī is the name of the Goddess of the Vedic Mantra in which the verse is composed. Its recitation is traditionally preceded by oṃ and the formula bhūr bhuvaḥ svaḥ, known as the mahāvyāhṛti, or “great utterance”. Maharshi Vishvamitra had created the Gayatri mantra. The Gayatri mantra is cited widely in Vedic and post-Vedic texts, such as the mantra listings of the Śrauta liturgy, and classical Hindu texts such as the Bhagavad Gita, Harivamsa, and Manusmṛti. The mantra and its associated metric form was known by the Buddha, and in one sutra the Buddha is described as “expressing their appreciation” for the mantra. The mantra is an important part of the upanayana ceremony for young males in Hinduism, and has long been recited by dvija men as part of their daily rituals. Modern Hindu reform movements spread the practice of the mantra to include women and all castes and its use is now very widespread. It is considered as one of the most important and powerful Vedic mantras.

(13 letters, 2 words)”gayatri mantra” = 58 (Full Reduction)

gayatri36mantra2258
7171299415291

(7 letters, 1 word)”science” = 58 (English Ordinal)

science58
193951435
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1958

1958

1958 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1958th year of the Common Era and Anno Domini designations, the 958th year of the 2nd millennium, the 58th year of the 20th century, and the 9th year of the 1950s decade.

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1985 – Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1985

  • Overview
  • Events
  • Births
  • Deaths
  • Nobel Prizes
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1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1985th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 985th year of the 2nd millennium, the 85th year of the 20th century, and the 6th year of the 1980s decade.
The year 1985 was designated as the International Youth Year by the United Nations.

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(7 letters, 2 words)
“dog star” = 
42
 (Reverse Full Reduction)

(0 letter, 1 word)”1958″ = 23 (Reverse Full Reduction)

195823
1958

(0 letter, 1 word)”1985″ = 23 (Reverse Full Reduction)

198523
1985

(0 letter, 1 word)”23″ = 5 (Reverse Full Reduction)

235
23
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(6 letters, 1 word)”pineal” = 33 (Reverse Full Reduction)

pineal33
294486
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(5 letters, 1 word)”brain” = 26 (Full Reduction)

brain26
29195

Luke 17:21 21nor will people say, ‘Here it is,’ or ‘There it is,’ because the kingdom of God is in your midst.”

(3 letters, 1 word)”dog” = 26 (English Ordinal)

dog26
4157

Dog Star[ˈdôɡ ˌstär]

DEFINITION

the star Sirius.

serious

[ˈsirēəs]

ADJECTIVE

(of a subject, state, or activity) demanding careful consideration or application.”marriage is a serious matter”

(5 letters, 1 word)”virus” = 26 (Full Reduction)

virus26
49931
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(6 letters, 1 word)”corona” = 33 (Reverse Full Reduction)

corona33
639348
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science (n.)

mid-14c., “what is known, knowledge (of something) acquired by study; information;” also “assurance of knowledge, certitude, certainty,” from Old French science “knowledge, learning, application; corpus of human knowledge” (12c.), from Latin scientia “knowledge, a knowing; expertness,” from sciens (genitive scientis) “intelligent, skilled,” present participle of scire “to know,” probably originally “to separate one thing from another, to distinguish,” related to scindere “to cut, divide,” from PIE root *skei- “to cut, split” (source also of Greek skhizein “to split, rend, cleave,” Gothic skaidan, Old English sceadan “to divide, separate”).

From late 14c. in English as “book-learning,” also “a particular branch of knowledge or of learning;” also “skillfulness, cleverness; craftiness.” From c. 1400 as “experiential knowledge;” also “a skill, handicraft; a trade.” From late 14c. as “collective human knowledge” (especially that gained by systematic observation, experiment, and reasoning). Modern (restricted) sense of “body of regular or methodical observations or propositions concerning a particular subject or speculation” is attested from 1725; in 17c.-18c. this concept commonly was called philosophy. Sense of “non-arts studies” is attested from 1670s. 

Science, since people must do it, is a socially embedded activity. It progresses by hunch, vision, and intuition. Much of its change through time does not record a closer approach to absolute truth, but the alteration of cultural contexts that influence it so strongly. Facts are not pure and unsullied bits of information; culture also influences what we see and how we see it. Theories, moreover, are not inexorable inductions from facts. The most creative theories are often imaginative visions imposed upon facts; the source of imagination is also strongly cultural. [Stephen Jay Gould, introduction to “The Mismeasure of Man,” 1981]

In science you must not talk before you know. In art you must not talk before you do. In literature you must not talk before you think. [John Ruskin, “The Eagle’s Nest,” 1872]

The distinction is commonly understood as between theoretical truth (Greek epistemē) and methods for effecting practical results (tekhnē), but science sometimes is used for practical applications and art for applications of skill. To blind (someone) with science “confuse by the use of big words or complex explanations” is attested from 1937, originally noted as a phrase from Australia and New Zealand.

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Origin and meaning of science
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Partly False InformationThe same information was checked in another post by independent fact-checkers.See WhyLikeCommentShare

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pseudo-science (n.)

also pseudoscience, “a pretended or mistaken science,” 1796 (the earliest reference is to alchemy), from pseudo- + science.

The term pseudo-science is hybrid, and therefore objectionable. Pseudognosy would be better etymology, but the unlearned might be apt to association with it the idea of a dog’s nose, and thus, instead of taking “the eel of science by the tail,” take the cur of science by the snout; so that all things considered we had better adopt the current term pseudo-sciences [“The Pseudo-Sciences,” in The St. James’s Magazine, January 1842]

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*skei

Proto-Indo-European root meaning “to cut, split,” extension of root *sek- “to cut.”

It forms all or part of: abscissaconscienceconsciousecuescudoescutcheonesquirenesciencenescientniceomniscienceomniscientplebisciteprescienceprescientrescindrescissionsciencescienterscilicetsciolistscissionschismschistschizo-schizophreniascudosheathsheathesheave (n.) “grooved wheel to receive a cord, pulley;” shed (v.) “cast off;” shin (n.) “fore part of the lower leg;” shingle (n.1) “thin piece of wood;” shit (v.); shiveshiver (n.1) “small piece, splinter, fragment, chip;” shoddyshysterskeneskiskive (v.1) “split or cut into strips, pare off, grind away;” squire.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit chindhichinatti “to break, split up;” Avestan a-sista- “unsplit, unharmed,” Greek skhizein “to split, cleave, part, separate;” Latin scindere “to cut, rend, tear asunder, split;” Armenian c’tim “to tear, scratch;” Lithuanian skiesti “to separate, divide;” Old Church Slavonic cediti “to strain;” Old English scitan, Old Norse skita “to defecate;” Old English sceað, Old High German sceida “sheath;” Old Irish sceid “to vomit, spit;” Welsh chwydu “to break open.”

Jiddu Krishnamurti
Quote – It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.
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Entries related to *skei-

  • *sek-
  • schizo-
  • abscissa
  • conscience
  • conscious
  • ecu
  • escudo
  • escutcheon
  • esquire
  • nescience
  • nescient
  • nice
  • omniscience
  • omniscient
  • plebiscite
  • prescience
  • prescient
  • rescind
  • rescission
  • schism

The sy-stem’s ‘care’ for you & y-our health is phony, a mask to cover its true brutal face of indifference- lust 4 power & control

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Donald Trump GIF by CBS News
internet technology GIF by Psyklon
john carpenter debate GIF by absurdnoise
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anonymous GIF
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Guy Fawkes Night

Annual Commemoration

Guy Fawkes Night, also known as Guy Fawkes Day, Bonfire Night and Fireworks Night, is an annual commemoration observed on 5 November, primarily in the United Kingdom. Its history begins with the events of 5 November 1605 O.S., when Guy Fawkes, a member of the Gunpowder Plot, was arrested while guarding explosives the plotters had placed beneath the House of Lords. Celebrating the fact that King James I had survived the attempt on his life, people lit bonfires around London; and months later, the introduction of the Observance of 5th November Act enforced an annual public day of thanksgiving for the plot’s failure.

Wikipedia

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(11 letters, 4 words)”v is for virus” = 119 (Reverse Ordinal)

v5is26for42virus46119
518821129518968
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http://www.gematrinator.com/index.php

(8 letters, 2 words)”pizza man” = 11(Reverse Ordinal)

pizza57man53110
11181126142613
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(16 letters, 4 words)”one hundred and ten” = 77 (Reverse Full Reduction)

one11hundred34and17ten1577
3441645945845744
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(16 letters, 4 words)”one hundred and ten” = 76 (Full Reduction)

one16hundred38and10ten1276
6558354954154255
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(8 letters, 3 words)”spirit of 76″ = 63 (Reverse Full Reduction)

spirit44of6761363
8299973376

(6 letters, 1 word)”eleven” = 63 (English Ordinal)

eleven63
512522514
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zeitgeist (n.)
1848, from German Zeitgeist (Herder, 1769), “spirit of the age,” literally “time-spirit,” from Zeit “time” (from Proto-Germanic *tidiz “division of time,” from PIE root *da- “to divide”) + Geist “spirit” (see ghost (n.)). Carlyle has it as a German word in “Sartor Resartus” (1840) and translates it as “Time-Spirit.”
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(9 letters, 1 word)”zeitgeist” = 120 (English Ordinal)

zeitgeist120
2659207591920

The Spirit of ’76 is a patriotic sentiment typified by the zeitgeist surrounding the American Revolution. It refers to the attitude of self-determination and individual liberty made manifest in the U.S. Declaration of Independence.Artist: Archibald MacNeal WillardLocation: Abbot Hall in Marblehead, MassachusettsType: OilYear: 1875

Spirit of ’76 (sentiment) – Wikipedia

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spirit_of_%2776_(sentiment)

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“The most important kind of freedom is to be what you really are. You trade in your reality for a role. You trade in your sense for an act. You give up your ability to feel, and in exchange, put on a mask. There can’t be any large-scale revolution until there’s a personal revolution, on an individual level. It’s got to happen inside first.”

Jim Morrison

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(13 letters, 3 words)”crown of thorns” = 188 (English Ordinal)

crown73of21thorns94188
31815231415620815181419

(14 letters, 2 words)”the coronavirus” = 188 (English Ordinal)

the33coronavirus155188
20853151815141229182119

“The Coronavirus” = 188 (English Ordinal), Same as “Crown of Thorns” = 188 (English Ordinal)

. . . Hmmm, I wonder why the General Public is kept Completely Clueless about the Science of Gematria, the Science/ Know-ledge of Abc = 123/ Tree? Could it be it is because it unveils the code/ book of life of the True Author-ity/ King of the Uni-Verse/ One Son-g/ Om/ Aum and the CR-Owners don’t won’t their sheep-le waking up and taking the Power/ Christ/ The Mask BACK, out of their Slimy, Greedy, Fat-Cat Hands/ Con-trol? The Code/ Book of Life Hiding in plain view, right out in the O-Pen, right under y-our noses, in the Alpha-Beta/ Aleph-Beth/ AlphaBet, Alpha-Om-mega, right there in plain English (Angel/ Angle-ish)? No, of course that couldn’t be, it’s just impossible. . . obviously I’m just being paranoid, conspiracy-theorizing (theo/ god-rising). . .

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Urban Dictionary: 86’d

https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=86’d

86’d To get rid of, originally for killing someone. The phrase “80 miles out and 6 feet under ” was reserved for someone who had to dig their own grave 80 miles from civilization and then get shot execution-style. All terms for 86’d originated from this, be it alcohol or eliminating.

(8 letters, 2 words)”game over” = 86 (English Ordinal)

game26over6086
711351522518

http://www.gematrinator.com/index.php

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About kylegrant76

Eye am that Eye am
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