Crazy

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crazy (adj.)

1570s, “diseased, sickly” (a sense now obsolete); 1580s, “broken, impaired, full of cracks or flaws,” from craze + -y (2). Meaning “deranged, demented, of unsound mind or behaving as so” is from 1610s. Jazz slang sense “cool, exciting is attested by 1927. Related: Crazily; craziness.

Ra

Ra
Ra
“hawk-headed sovereign sun god of Egyptian mythology,” from Egyptian R “sun, day.”

Ra or Re is the ancient Egyptian deity of the sun. By the Fifth Dynasty in the 25th and 24th centuries BC, he had become one of the most important gods in ancient Egyptian religion, identified primarily with the noon sun. Ra was believed to rule in all parts of the created world: the sky, the Earth, and the underworld. He was the god of the sun, order, kings, and the sky.

R = Letter# 18

(1+0+8/ 6+6+6/

3+6+0)

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From ‘The Etymology of the Letter R’ (www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=R)

“There are localities where the normal vibration of the tip of the tongue is replaced by one of the uvula, making a guttural trill, which is still more entitled to the name of “dog’s letter” than is the ordinary r; such are considerable parts of France and Germany; the sound appears to occur only sporadically in English pronunciation. [Century Dictionary]”

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Urania
name of the Muse of astronomy and celestial forces, from Latin Urania, from Greek Ourania, fem. of ouranios, literally “heavenly,” from ouranos (see Uranus).

To drive (someone) crazy is attested by 1873. To do something like crazy “with manic vigor or frequency” is by 1905. Phrase crazy like a fox has origins by 1935. Crazy Horse, name of the Teton Lakhota (Siouan) war leader (d. 1877), translates thašuka witko, literally “his horse is crazy.” Crazy-quilt (1886) preserves the original “break to pieces” sense of craze (v.). Crazy bone as an alternative to funny bone is recorded by 1853.

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rational (adj.)
late 14c., “pertaining to reason;” mid-15c., “endowed with reason,” from Old French racionel and directly from Latin rationalis “of or belonging to reason, reasonable,” from ratio (genitive rationis) “reckoning, calculation, reason” (see ratio).
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ray (n.1)
“beam of light,” c. 1300, from Old French rai (nominative rais) “ray (of the sun), spoke (of a wheel); gush, spurt,” from Latin radius “ray, spoke, staff, rod” (see radius). Not common before 17c. [OED]; of the sun, usually in reference to heat (beam being preferred for light). Science fiction ray-gun is first recorded 1931 (but the Martians had a heat ray weapon in H.G. Wells’ “War of the Worlds,” 1898).
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radiance (n.)
c. 1600, “brilliant light,” from radiant or else from Medieval Latin radiantia “brightness,” from radiare “to beam, shine” (see radiation). Figurative use from 1761. Related: Radiancy.


luster (n.1)
“gloss, radiance, quality of shining by reflecting light,” 1520s, from Middle French lustre “gloss, radiance” (14c.), common Romanic (cognates: Spanish and Portuguese lustre, Rumanian lustru, Italian lustro “splendor, brilliancy”), a noun ultimately from Latin lustrare “spread light over, brighten, illumine,” which is related to lustrum “purification,” from PIE *leuk-stro-, suffixed form of root *leuk- “light, brightness.”
Especially “quality of glossiness or radiance in a textile material or fabric.” Figurative meaning “radiant beauty” is from c. 1600; that of “splendor, renown” is from 1550s. Lusterware, also lustre-ware, “stoneware or crockery having surface ornamentations in metallic colors,” is attested by 182
0.

phosphorus (n.)
1640s, “substance or organism that shines of itself,” from Latin phosphorus “light-bringing,” also “the morning star” (a sense attested in English from 1620), from Greek Phosphoros “morning star,” literally “torchbearer,” from phos “light,” contraction of phaos “light, daylight” (related to phainein “to show, to bring to light,” from PIE root *bha- (1) “to shine”) + phoros “bearer,” from pherein “to carry” (from PIE root *bher- (1) “to carry,” also “to bear children”).

As the name of a solid, non-metallic, combustible chemical element, it is recorded from 1680, originally one among several substances so called; the word used exclusively of the element from c. 1750. It was discovered in 1669 by Henning Brand, merchant and alchemist of Hamburg, who derived it from urine. Lavoisier demonstrated it was an element in 1777. According to Flood, “It is the first element whose discoverer is known.”


Horus
Egyptian hawk-headed god of dual relations, 1650s, from Latin Horus, from Greek Horos, from Egyptian Hor, said to mean literally “the high-flying one.”

Mithras

ancient Persian god of light or the sun, eventually regarded as ruler of the material and spiritual universe, 1550s, from Latin, from Greek Mithras, from Avestan Mithra-, from Indo-Iranian *mitram “contract,” whence *mitras “contractual partner, friend,” conceptualized as a god, or, according to Kent, first the epithet of a divinity and eventually his name. Perhaps from PIE root *mei- (1) “to change; exchange,” on the notion of “god of the contract” [Watkins].

Related to Sanskrit Mitrah, a Vedic deity associated with Varuna. “His name is one of the earliest Indic words we possess, being found in clay tablets from Anatolia dating to about 1500 B.C.” [Calvert Watkins, “Dictionary of Indo-European Roots,” 2000]. His worship was adopted by the Romans and enjoyed great popularity in the early empire. Related: MithraicMithraism.

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Aryan
c. 1600, as a term in classical history, from Latin Arianus, Ariana, from Greek Aria, Areia, names applied in classical times to the eastern part of ancient Persia and to its inhabitants. Ancient Persians used the name in reference to themselves (Old Persian ariya-), hence Iran. Ultimately from Sanskrit arya- “compatriot;” in later language “noble, of good family.”
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Entries related to Crazy

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Reagan

surname, from Irish riagan, literally “little king.” Reaganism first recorded 1966, in reference to policies of Ronald W. Reagan (1911-2004), U.S. governor of California 1967-75, U.S. president 1981-89.

Entries related to Reagan

  • reaganomics
  • Dictionary entries near Reagan

re-admit

read-out

ready

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re-affirm

re-affirmation

Reagan

Reaganomics

reagent

re-aggravate

real

realia

Uranus
first planet discovered that was not known in ancient times, named for the god of Heaven, husband of Gaia, the Earth, from Latin Uranus, from Greek Ouranos literally “heaven, the sky;” in Greek cosmology, the god who personifies the heavens, father of the titans.
The planet was discovered and identified as such in 1781 by Sir William Herschel (it had been observed before, but mistaken for a star; in 1690 John Flamsteed cataloged it as 34 Tauri); Herschel proposed calling it Georgium Sidus, literally “George’s Star,” in honour of his patron, King George III of England.

I cannot but wish to take this opportunity of expressing my sense of gratitude, by giving the name of Georgium Sidus … to a star which (with respect to us) first began to shine under His auspicious reign. [Sir William Herschel, 1783]

The planet was known in English in 1780s as the Georgian Planet; French astronomers began calling Herschel, and ultimately German astronomer Johann Bode proposed Uranus as in conformity with other planet names. However, the name didn’t come into common usage until c. 1850.
uranian (adj.)
“homosexual,” 1893, from the reference to Aphrodite in Plato’s “Symposium;” Urania “Heavenly” (Greek Ourania; see Uranus) being an epithet of Aphrodite as born of Uranus and also as distinguished from the vulgar Venus of commonplace lust.

But the son of the heavenly Aphrodite is sprung from a mother in whose birth the female has no part, but she is from the male only; this is that love which is of youths only, and the goddess being older has nothing of wantonness. Those who are inspired by this love turn to the male, and delight in him who is the more valiant and intelligent nature; any one may recognize the pure enthusiasts in the very character of their attachments. [Benjamin Jowett, transl., 1874]

Also as a noun, “a homosexual person” (1908). Related uranism “homosexuality” (1893).
uranium (n.)
rare metallic element, 1797, named 1789 in Modern Latin by its discoverer, German chemist and mineralogist Martin Heinrich Klaproth, for the recently found planet Uranus (q.v.).
plutonium (n.)
transuranic metallic element, 1942, from Pluto, the planet, + element ending -ium. Discovered at University of California, Berkeley, in 1941, the element was named on suggestion of Seaborg and Wahl because it follows neptunium in the periodic table as Pluto follows (or followed) Neptune in the Solar System. The name plutonium earlier had been proposed for barium and was used sometimes in this sense early 19c.
Lazarus (L+Osiris/ O+Sirius)
Biblical character (Luke xvi.20), the poor man covered in sores; his name was extended in medieval usage to “any poor and visibly diseased person” (compare lazar, mid-14c., “one deformed and nauseous with filthy and pestilential diseases” [Johnson]). The name is from a Greek rendition of Hebrew El’azar, literally “(he whom) God has helped.”
Pluto (n.)
Roman god of the underworld, early 14c., from Latin PlutoPluton, from Greek Ploutōn “god of wealth,” from ploutos “wealth, riches,” probably originally “overflowing,” from PIE root *pleu- “to flow.” The alternative Greek name or epithet of Hades in his function as the god of wealth (precious metals and gems, coming from beneath the earth, form part of his realm). The planet (since downgraded) was discovered 1930 by U.S. astronomer Clyde W. Tombaugh; Minerva also was suggested as a name for it. The cartoon dog first appeared in Walt Disney’s “Moose Hunt,” released April 1931.
Hades
“god of the dead in Greek mythology;” also the name of his realm, the abode of the dead spirits, 1590s, from Greek Haidēs, in Homer the name of the god of the underworld, son of Kronos and Rhea, brother of Zeus and Poseidon. His name is of unknown origin. Perhaps literally “the invisible” [Watkins], from privative prefix a- + idein “to see” (from PIE root *weid- “to see”). The name of the god was extended in later Greek writing to his kingdom, also “the grave, death.” Related: Hadal (adj.), 1964; Hadean.
*weid-
Proto-Indo-European root meaning “to see.”
It forms all or part of: adviceadvisebelvedereclairvoyantdeja vuDruideideticeidolonenvyevidentguideguidonguiseguy (n.1) “small rope, chain, wire;” GwendolynHadeshistoryideaideo-idolidyllimprovisationimproviseinterviewinvidiouskaleidoscope-oidpenguinpolyhistorprevisionprovideprovidenceprudentpurveypurviewreviewreviseRig Vedastory (n.1) “connected account or narration of some happening;” supervisesurveytwitunwittingVedavideviewvisavisagevisionvisitvisorvistavoyeurwise (adj.) “learned, sagacious, cunning;” wise (n.) “way of proceeding, manner;” wisdomwiseacrewit (n.) “mental capacity;” wit (v.) “to know;” witenagemotwittingwot.
It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit veda “I know;” Avestan vaeda “I know;” Greek oida, Doric woida “I know,” idein “to see;” Old Irish fis “vision,” find “white,” i.e. “clearly seen,” fiuss “knowledge;” Welsh gwyn, Gaulish vindos, Breton gwenn “white;” Gothic, Old Swedish, Old English witan “to know;” Gothic weitan “to see;” English wise, German wissen “to know;” Lithuanian vysti “to see;” Bulgarian vidya “I see;” Polish widzieć “to see,” wiedzieć “to know;” Russian videt’ “to see,” vest’ “news,” Old Russian vedat’ “to know.”
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*kele- (2)

*kelə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning “to shout.” Perhaps imitative.

It forms all or part of: acclaimacclamationAufklarungcalendarchiaroscuroclaimClaireclairvoyanceclairvoyantclamorClaraclaretclarifyclarinetclarionclarityclassclearcledonismconciliateconciliationcouncildeclaimdeclaredisclaimecclesiasticeclairexclaimglairhale (v.); halyardintercalatehaulkeelhaullow (v.); nomenclatureparacleteproclaimreclaimreconcile.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit usakala “cock,” literally “dawn-calling;” Latin calare “to announce solemnly, call out,” clamare “to cry out, shout, proclaim;” Middle Irish cailech “cock;” Greek kalein “to call,” kelados “noise,” kledon “report, fame;” Old High German halan “to call;” Old English hlowan “to low, make a noise like a cow;” Lithuanian kalba “language.

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Clara
fem. personal name, from Latin Clara, fem. of clarus “bright, shining, clear” (see clear (adj.) and compare Claire). Derivatives include ClarisseClariceClarabelClaribel. The native form Clare was common in medieval England, perhaps owing to the popularity of St. Clare of Assisi.
plutocracy (n.)
“government by the wealthy class; a class ruling by virtue of wealth,” 1650s, from Greek ploutokratia “rule or power of the wealthy or of wealth,” from ploutos “wealth” (see Pluto) + -kratia “rule” (see -cracy). Synonym plutarchy is slightly older (1640s). Pluto-democracy “plutocracy masquerading as democracy” is from 1895.
cracy
word-forming element forming nouns meaning “rule or government by,” from French -cratie or directly from Medieval Latin -cratia, from Greek -kratia “power, might; rule, sway; power over; a power, authority,” from kratos “strength,” from PIE *kre-tes- “power, strength,” suffixed form of root *kar- “hard.” The connective -o- has come to be viewed as part of it. Productive in English from c. 1800.
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hocus-pocus (interj.)

magical formula used in conjuring, 1630s, earlier Hocas Pocas, common name of a magician or juggler (1620s); a sham-Latin invocation used by jugglers, perhaps based on a perversion of the sacramental blessing from the Mass, Hoc est corpus meum “This is my body.” The first to make this speculation on its origin apparently was English prelate John Tillotson (1630-1694).

I will speak of one man … that went about in King James his time … who called himself, the Kings Majesties most excellent Hocus Pocus, and so was called, because that at the playing of every Trick, he used to say, Hocus pocus, tontus tabantus, vade celeriter jubeo, a dark composure of words, to blinde the eyes of the beholders, to make his Trick pass the more currantly without discovery. [Thomas Ady, “A Candle in the Dark,” 1655]

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Compare hiccus doccius or hiccus doctius, “formula used by jugglers in performing their feats” (1670s), also a common name for a juggler, which OED says is “conjectured to be a corruption of” Latin hicce es doctus “here is the learned man,” “if not merely a nonsense formula simulating Latin.” Also compare holus-bolus (adv.) “all at a gulp, all at once,” which Century Dictionary calls “A varied redupl. of whole, in sham-Latin form.” As a noun meaning “juggler’s tricks,” hocus-pocus is recorded from 1640s.

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hokum (n.)

1917, theater slang, “melodramatic, exaggerated acting,” probably formed on model of bunkum (see bunk (n.2)), and perhaps also influenced by or based on hocus-pocus.

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hoke (v.)

“overact, act insincerely,” 1935, theatrical slang, probably back-formed from hokum. Often with up (adv.).

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“The Greeks had a word, xenia—guest friendship—a command to take care of traveling strangers, to open your door to whoever is out there, because anyone passing by, far from home, might be God. Ovid tells the story of two immortals who came to Earth in disguise to cleanse the sickened world. No one would let them in but one old couple, Baucis and Philemon. And their reward for opening their door to strangers was to live on after death as trees—an oak and a linden—huge and gracious and intertwined. What we care for, we will grow to resemble. And what we resemble will hold us, when we are us no longer. . . .”
― Richard Powers, The Overstory
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hokey (adj.)

1927, from hoke + -y (2). Related: Hokiness.

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columbine (n.)
popular name of a garden flower, c. 1300, from Old French columbine “columbine,” or directly from Medieval Latin columbina, from Late Latin columbina “verbena,” fem. of Latin columbinus, literally “dove-like,” from columba “dove.” The inverted flower supposedly resembles a cluster of five doves. Also a fem. proper name; in Italian comedy, the name of the mistress of Harlequin.
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bunk (n.2)

“nonsense,” 1900, short for bunkum, phonetic spelling of Buncombe, a county in North Carolina. The usual story (attested by 1841) of its origin is this: At the close of the protracted Missouri statehood debates in the U.S. Congress, supposedly on Feb. 25, 1820, North Carolina Rep. Felix Walker (1753-1828) began what promised to be a “long, dull, irrelevant speech,” and he resisted calls to cut it short by saying he was bound to say something that could appear in the newspapers in the home district and prove he was on the job. “I shall not be speaking to the House,” he confessed, “but to Buncombe.” Thus Bunkum has been American English slang for “nonsense” since 1841 (it is attested from 1838 as generic for “a U.S. Representative’s home district”).

MR. WALKER, of North Carolina, rose then to address the Committee on the question [of Missouri statehood]; but the question was called for so clamorously and so perseveringly that Mr. W. could proceed no farther than to move that the committee rise. [Annals of Congress, House of Representatives, 16th Congress, 1st Session, p. 1539]

“Well, when a critter talks for talk sake, jist to have a speech in the paper to send to home, and not for any other airthly puppus but electioneering, our folks call it Bunkum.” [Thomas Chandler Haliburton, “Sam Slick in England,” 1858]

debunk (v.)

“expose false or nonsensical claims or sentiments,” 1923, from de- + bunk (n.2); apparently first used by U.S. novelist William Woodward (1874-1950), in his best-seller “Bunk;” the notion being “to take the bunk out of things.” It got a boost from Harold U. Faulkner’s “Colonial History Debunked” [Harper’s Magazine, December 1925], which article itself quickly was debunked, and the word was in vogue in America in the mid-1920s. Related: Debunkeddebunking.

Wets and Drys, Fundamentalists and Modernists, are busily engaged in debunking one another to the delight and edification of a public which divides its time between automobiling and listening-in. Is it art, or education, or religion that you prefer? You have only to get the right station and what you last heard about the matter will be cleverly debunked while you wait. [Carl Vernon Tower, “Genealogy ‘Debunked'”, in “Annual Reports of the Tower Genealogical Society,” 1925]

It was, naturally, execrated in England.

The origin of to debunk is doubtless the same as that of American jargon in general — the inability of an ill-educated and unintelligent democracy to assimilate long words. Its intrusion in our own tongue is due partly to the odious novelty of the word itself, and partly to the prevailing fear that to write exact English nowadays is to be put down as a pedant and a prig. [letter to the editor, London Daily Telegraph, March 2, 1935, cited in Mencken, “The American Language”]

yank (v.)

“to pull, jerk,” 1822, Scottish, of unknown origin. Related: Yankedyanking. The noun is 1818 in sense of “sudden blow, cuff;” 1856 (American English) as “a sudden pull.”

Dictionary entries near debunk

debrief

debris

debt

debtor

debug

debunk

debut

debutant

debutante

deca-

decade

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bunker (n.)

1758, originally Scottish, “seat, bench,” a word of uncertain origin, possibly a variant of banker “bench” (1670s; see bank (n.2)); or possibly from a Scandinavian source (compare Old Swedish bunke “boards used to protect the cargo of a ship”). Meaning “receptacle for coal aboard a ship” is from 1839. Of sand-holes on golf courses, by 1824, from the extended sense “earthen seat” (1805). The meaning “dug-out fortification” probably is from World War I.

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sap (n.1)
liquid in a plant,” Old English sæp, from Proto-Germanic *sapam (source also of Middle Low German, Middle Dutch, Dutch sap, Old High German saf, German Saft “juice”), from PIE root *sab- “juice, fluid” (source also of Sanskrit sabar- “sap, milk, nectar,” Irish sug, Russian soku “sap,” Lithuanian sakas “tree-gum”). As a verb meaning “To drain the sap from,” 1725.
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bank (n.1)

“financial institution,” late 15c., originally “money-dealer’s counter or shop,” from either Old Italian banca or Middle French banque (itself from the Italian word), both meaning “table,” from a Germanic source (such as Old High German bank “bench, moneylender’s table”), from Proto-Germanic *bankiz- “shelf,” *bankon- (see bank (n.2)). The etymonlogical notion is of the moneylender’s exchange table.

As “institution for receiving and lending money” from 1620s. In games of chance, “the sum of money held by the proprietor or one who plays against the rest,” by 1720. Bank holiday is from 1871, though the tradition is as old as the Bank of England. To cry all the way to the bank was coined 1956 by U.S. pianist Liberace, after a Madison Square Garden concert that was panned by critics but packed with patrons.

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higgledy-piggledy

“confusedly, hurriedly,” 1590s, a “vocal gesture” [OED] probably formed from pig and the animal’s suggestions of mess and disorder. Reduplications in the h-/p- pattern are common (as in hanky-pankyhocus-pocushinch(y)-pinch(y), an obsolete children’s game, attested from c. 1600).

Edward Moor, “Suffolk Words and Phrases” (London, 1823), quotes a list of “conceited rhyming words or reduplications” from the 1768 edition of John Ray’s “Collection of English Words Not Generally Used,” all said to “signify any confusion or mixture;” the list has higgledy-piggledyhurly-burlyhodge-podgemingle-manglearsy-versykim-kamhub-bubcrawly-mauly, and hab-nab. “To which he might have added,” Moor writes, crincum-crankumcrinkle-crankleflim-flamfiddle-faddlegibble-gabbleharum-scarumhelter-skelterhiccup-suickuphocus-pocushotch-potchhugger-muggerhumdrumhum-strumhurry-scurryjibber-jabberprittle-prattleshilly-shallytittle-tattle, and topsy-turvy. Many of these date to the 16th century.

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bank (n.2)

“natural earthen incline bordering a body of water,” c. 1200, from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse *banki, Old Danish banke “sandbank,” from Proto-Germanic *bankon “slope,” cognate with *bankiz “shelf” (see bench (n.)). As “rising ground in a sea or rover, shoal,” from c. 1600. As “bench for rowers in an ancient galley,” 1590s.

There probably was an Old English cognate but it is not attested in surviving documents. The nasalized form likely is a variant of Old Norse bakki “(river) bank, ridge, mound; cloud bank,” cognate with Swedish backe, Danish bakke “hill, rising ground.”

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Entries related to higgledy-piggledy

  • arsy-versy
  • fiddle-faddle
  • flim-flam
  • harum-scarum
  • helter-skelter
  • hocus-pocus
  • hodge-podge
  • hub-bub
  • hugger-mugger
  • humdrum
  • hurly-burly
  • hurry-scurry
  • jibber-jabber
  • pig
  • shilly-shally
  • topsy-turvy
strange (adj.)
late 13c., straunge, “from elsewhere, foreign, unknown, unfamiliar, not belonging to the place where found,” from Old French estrange “foreign, alien, unusual, unfamiliar, curious; distant; inhospitable; estranged, separated” (Anglo-French estraunge, strange, straunge; Modern French étrange), from Latin extraneus “foreign, external, from without” (source also of Italian strano “strange, foreign,” Spanish extraño), from extra “outside of” (see extra-). In early use also strounge. The surname Lestrange is attested from late 12c. Sense of “queer, surprising” is attested from c. 1300, also “aloof, reserved, distant; estranged.” In nuclear physics, from 1956.
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person (n.)
c. 1200, persoun, “an individual, a human being,” from Old French persone “human being, anyone, person” (12c., Modern French personne) and directly from Latin persona “human being, person, personage; a part in a drama, assumed character,” originally “a mask, a false face,” such as those of wood or clay, covering the whole head, worn by the actors in later Roman theater. OED offers the general 19c. explanation of persona as “related to” Latin personare “to sound through” (i.e. the mask as something spoken through and perhaps amplifying the voice), “but the long o makes a difficulty ….” Klein and Barnhart say it is possibly borrowed from Etruscan phersu “mask.” De Vaan has no entry for it.
From mid-13c. as “one of the persons of the Trinity,” a theological use in Church Latin of the classical word. Meanings “one’s physical being, the living body; external appearance” are from late 14c. In grammar, “one of the relations which a subject may have to a verb,” from 1510s. In legal use, “corporate body or corporation other than the state and having rights and duties before the law,” 15c., short for person aggregate (c. 1400), person corporate (mid-15c.).
The use of -person to replace -man in compounds for the sake of gender neutrality or to avoid allegations of sexism is recorded by 1971 (in chairperson). In person “by bodily presence” is from 1560s. Person-to-person is attested by 1919, originally of telephone calls.

bank (v.1)

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Ankh
The ankh or key of life is an ancient Egyptian hieroglyphic symbol that was most commonly used in writing and in Egyptian art to represent the word for “life” and, by extension, as a symbol of life itself.

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to act as a banker,” 1727, from bank (n.1). As “to deposit in a bank” from 1833. Figurative sense of “to rely on” (i.e. “to put money on”) is from 1884, U.S. colloquial. Related: Bankedbankingbankable.

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anchor (n.)
“device for securing ships to the ground under the water by means of cables,” Old English ancor, borrowed 9c. from Latin ancora “an anchor,” from or cognate with Greek ankyra “an anchor, a hook,” from PIE root *ang-/*ank- “to bend” (see angle (n.)).
A very early borrowing into English and said to be the only Latin nautical term used in the Germanic languages (German Anker, Swedish ankar, etc.). The unetymological -ch- emerged late 16c., a pedantic imitation of a corrupt spelling of the Latin word. The figurative sense of “that which gives stability or security” is from late 14c. Meaning “host or presenter of a TV or radio program” is from 1965, short for anchorman (q.v.).
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bank (v.2)

1580s, “to form a bank or slope or rise,” from bank (n.2). Meaning “to rise in banks” is by 1870. That of “to ascend,” as of an incline, is from 1892. In aeronautics, from 1911. Related: Bankedbanking.

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hanky-panky (n.)

also hanky panky, 1841, “trickery,” British slang, possibly a variant of hoky-poky “deception, fraud,” altered from hocus-pocus.

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Yankee Doodle (n.)

popular tune of the American Revolution, apparently written c. 1755 by British Army surgeon Dr. Richard Schuckburgh while campaigning with Amherst’s force in upper New York during the French and Indian War. The original verses mocked the colonial troops (see Yankee) serving alongside the regulars, and the Doodle element might have been, or hinted at, the 18c. slang term for “penis.” The song naturally was popular with British troops in the colonies during the Revolutionary War, but after the colonials began to win skirmishes with them in 1775, they took the tune as a patriotic prize and re-worked the lyrics. The current version seems to have been written in 1776 by Edward Bangs, a Harvard sophomore who also was a Minuteman.

bank (v.3)

originally in billiards, “to make (the cue ball) touch the cushion (bank) of the table before touching another ball,” by 1909, from a specialized sense of bank (n.2); probably abstracted from bank-shot (n.), which is attested by 1889. Related: Bankedbanking.

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Dictionary entries near bank

bangs

banish

banishment

banister

banjo

bank

banker

banking

bankroll

bankrupt

bankruptcy

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hoax

1796 (v.) “ridicule; deceive with a fabrication,” 1808 (n.), probably an alteration of hocus “conjurer, juggler” (1630s), also “a cheat, impostor” (1680s); or else directly from hocus-pocus. Related: Hoaxedhoaxing.

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Dictionary entries near hoax

hoarder

hoarding

hoarfrost

hoarse

hoary

hoax

Hob

hob

Hobbesian

Hobbit

hobble

Dictionary entries near hocus-pocus

Hobson’s choice

Hobson-Jobson

hoc

hock

hockey

hocus-pocus

hod

ho-de-ho

Hodge

hodgepodge

hodge-podge

The Fool = The 0 Card of the Tarot Deck of Cards – April’s/ Aphrodite’s/ Venus’s/ Ishtar’s/ Easter’s ‘Fool’- Jesus Christ, God’s Son/ Sun-day/ Deity/ Sun God/ Son of God/ Anthropomorphic Character of Nature/ Person-eye-fication/ Mask of the Calendar Year/ Cylinder Here/ Hear/ Sound/ Sun-Day/ Lord/ Logos/ Logic/ Light/ Height/ Heaven/ Sky/ Creator/ Creation/ Destructor/ Destruction/ Deva-L/ The Jes-ter Jes-us/ Josh-ua/ Yes-hua/ Hue-man Be-ing/ Avatar Actor/ Director/ Writer/ Producer/ Too/ To/ 2/ Two-Rays/ Torah’s/ To-Ra’s/ Jah-Zeus/ Jupiter/ God/ Good/ Harvest/ Willing Sacrifice/ Sack Ra Fire ice-US/ Isis/ Isidore/ Is-A-Door/ The 1st Fool/ Sol/ Soul Saver/ Save-Your/ Yore/ John/ Jah-in/ Jack/ Jah-key/ Jockey/ Jock-eye/ Joker/ Honor-A-Bull/ Lord of Misrule/ Yule/ Jewel/ Blood/ Blade/ Bless-sing/ Psalm/ Plasm-A-leph/ A-life/ A-light/ No-El/ No-El/ Common-union/ Communion/ Comm-unity/ Spear-it of Nature/ Blood and Flesh/ Wine/ Di-Vine/ Di-Vide/ Da-Vid/ Co-Vid 19/ 10/ 1/ Phoenix/ Phone-ix-xi/ C-all 911/ 119/ Hanged Man/ 12-Tree/ 3+30 = Crucifixion/ Crisscross/ A+Om-meg-A/ A-T-wen-T – K-in-G F-El-ix -D-Cypher- Pair of Bulls/ Bullshit/ Shed/ Shad-d-ai/ El/ All-Ah/ T-Ra-v-el-ling Foo-l/ Step$- Sheep-herd-eR/ Sower/ Seed-Man/ Apple/ Apollo/ Mustard Tree/ Roost/ Roast/ Ra-Astro-Logos/ Star Lord/ Word/ Bird
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Vulcan (n.)

god of fire and metal-work in Roman mythology, 1510s, from Latin VulcanusVolcanus, according to Klein a word of Etruscan origin. Often with allusions to his lameness and the unfaithfulness of his wife, Venus. As the name of a hypothetical planet between Mercury and the Sun, it is attested from 1860 in English (see intramercurial). The Roman feast of Vulcanalia was on Aug. 23.

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intramercurial (adj.)

“being within the orbit of the planet Mercury,” 1859, especially in reference to a supposed planet orbiting there (sought in vain in the eclipse of 1860), from intra- “within, inside” + Mercury (Latin Mercurius) + -al (1). The idea originated in France in the 1840s with Urbain Le Verrier, who later became director of the Paris Observatory. There was some excitement about it in 1859 when a French doctor named Lescarbault claimed to have tracked it crossing the Sun’s disk and convinced Le Verrier. It was sought in vain in the solar eclipses of 1860, ’68, and ’69. See Vulcan.

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hermetic (adj.)
1630s “dealing with occult science or alchemy,” from Latin hermeticus, from Greek Hermes, god of science and art (among other things), who was identified by Neoplatonists, mystics, and alchemists with the Egyptian god Thoth as Hermes Trismegistos “Thrice-Great Hermes,” who supposedly invented the process of making a glass tube airtight (a process in alchemy) using a secret seal. Hence, “completely sealed” (c. 1600, implied in hermetically).
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Thoth
Thoth is an ancient Egyptian deity. In art, he was often depicted as a man with the head of an ibis or a baboon, animals sacred to him. His feminine counterpart was Seshat, and his wife was Ma’at. He was the god of wisdom, writing, hieroglyphs, science, magic, art, judgment, and the dead.


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thought (n.)
Old English þohtgeþoht “process of thinking, a thought; compassion,” from stem of þencan “to conceive of in the mind, consider” (see think). Cognate with the second element in German Gedächtnis “memory,” Andacht “attention, devotion,” Bedacht “consideration, deliberation.”

Bammesberger (“English Etymology”) explains that in Germanic -kt- generally shifted to -ht-, and a nasal before -ht- was lost. Proto-Germanic *thankija- added a suffix -t in the past tense. By the first pattern the Germanic form was *thanht-, by the second the Old English was þoht.

Second thought “later consideration” is recorded from 1640s. Thought-crime is from “Nineteen Eighty-Four” (1949); thought police is attested from 1945, originally in reference to war-time Japanese Special Higher Police (Tokubetsu Koto Keisatsu).
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splice (v.)
1520s, originally a sailors’ word, from Middle Dutch splissen “to splice” (Dutch splitsen), from Proto-Germanic *spli-, from PIE root *(s)plei- “to split, splice” (see flint). The Dutch word was borrowed in French as épisser. Used of motion picture film from 1912; of DNA from 1975. Related: Splicedsplicingsplicer.
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Kundalini
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Jump to navigationJump to searchFor other uses, see Kundalini (disambiguation).

Kundalini, chakras, and nadis
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Kundalini (Sanskrit: कुण्डलिनी kuṇḍalinīpronunciation (help·info), “coiled snake”), in Hinduism is a form of divine feminine energy (or shakti) believed to be located at the base of the spine, in the muladhara. It is an important concept in Śhaiva Tantra, where it is believed to be a force or power associated with the divine feminine or the formless aspect of the Goddess[1]. This energy[2] in the body, when cultivated and awakened through tantric practice, is believed to lead to spiritual liberation. Kuṇḍalinī is associated with Parvati or Adi Parashakti, the supreme being in Shaktism; and with the goddesses Bhairavi and Kubjika.[3][4] The term, along with practices associated with it, was adopted into Hatha yoga in the 9th century.[5] It has since then been adopted into other forms of Hinduism as well as modern spirituality and New age thought.
Kuṇḍalinī awakenings have been described as occurring by means of a variety of methods. Many systems of yoga focus on awakening Kuṇḍalinī through: meditationpranayama breathing; the practice of asana and chanting of mantras.[6] Kundalini Yoga is influenced by Shaktism and Tantra schools of Hinduism. It derives its name from its focus upon the awakening of kundalini energy through regular practice of MantraTantraYantraAsanas or Meditation.[6][7] The Kuṇḍalinī experience is frequently reported to be a distinct feeling of electric current running along the spine.[8][9][10]

DNA (n.)

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also D.N.A., 1944, abbreviation of deoxyribonucleic acid (1931).

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rib (n.)
Old English ribb “rib,” from Proto-Germanic *rebjan (source also of Old Norse rif, Old Saxon ribbi, Old Frisian ribb, Middle Dutch, Dutch ribbe, Old High German ribba, German Rippe), which is perhaps literally “a covering” (of the cavity of the chest), from PIE *rebh- “to roof, cover” (source also of Greek ereptein “to roof,” Old Church Slavonic rebro “rib, reef”), with a semantic development to “rib” in Germanic and Slavic, but Boutkan considers this doubtful. As an item of food from early 15c. Rib joint “brothel” is slang from 1943, probably in reference to Adam’s rib (compare rib “woman, wife,” attested from 1580s).

rib (v.)
“tease, fool,” 1930, apparently from rib (n.); perhaps as a figurative suggestion of poking someone in the ribs. Related: Ribbedribbing.


reef (n.1)
“rock ridge underwater,” 1580s, riffe, probably via Dutch riffe, from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse rif “ridge in the sea; reef in a sail,” literally “rib” (see rib (n.)).


reef (n.2)
“horizontal section of sail,” late 14c. (mid-14c. in rif-rope), from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse rif “reef of a sail,” probably a transferred use of rif “ridge under the sea; rib” (see rib (n.) and compare reef (n.1)). German reff, Swedish ref, Norwegian riv, Danish reb likely all are from the Old Norse word.
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dan

title of address to members of religious orders, c. 1300, from Old French dan (Modern French dom), from Latin dominus “lord” (source also of Portuguese don, Spanish don, Italian donno), from domus “house” (from PIE root *dem- “house, household”).

Dan (1)

familiar form of masc. proper name Daniel.

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brown (adj.)
Old English brun “dark, dusky,” developing a definite color sense only 13c., from Proto-Germanic *brunaz (source also of Old Norse brunn, Danish brun, Old Frisian and Old High German brun, Dutch bruin, German braun), from PIE root *bher- (2) “bright; brown.”
The Old English word also had a sense of “brightness, shining,” preserved only in burnish. The Germanic word was adopted into Romanic (Middle Latin brunus, Italian and Spanish bruno, French brun). Brown sugar is from 1704. Brown Bess, slang name for old British Army flintlock musket, is first recorded 1785. Brown study “state of mental abstraction or meditation” is from 1530s; OED says the notion is “gloomy.” Brown-paper “kind of coarse, stout, unbleached paper used for wrapping” is from 1650s.

Dan (2)

name of one of the 12 tribes of ancient Israel or its territory, named for its founder; literally “he who judges,” related to Hebrew din “to judge.” In the Old Testament, it occupied the northernmost part of Israel, hence its use proverbially for “utmost extremity,” as in from Dan to Beersheba (the southernmost region), 1738. Related: Danite.

coral (n.)

general name for the hard, calcareous skeleton excreted by certain marine polyps, c. 1300, from Old French coral (12c., Modern French corail), from Latin corallium, from Greek korallion, a word perhaps of Semitic origin (compare Hebrew goral “small pebble,” Arabic garal “small stone”).

Originally especially the red variety found in the Mediterranean, used ornamentally, hence “red, the (red) color of coral” (mid-15c.). As an adjective, “made of coral,” mid-15c. The coral-snake (1760) is so called for the red zones in its markings. Coral-reef is attested from 1745 (see reef (n.1)).

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Lakshmi
Hindu goddess of beauty, said to be from Sanskrit lakshmi “mark, fortune, riches, beauty.”
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luck (n.)
c. 1500, “fortune good or bad, what happens to one by chance (conceived as being favorable or not); good luck, quality of having a tendency to receive desired or beneficial outcomes,” not found in Old English, probably from early Middle Dutch luc, shortening of gheluc “happiness, good fortune,” a word of unknown origin. It has cognates in Modern Dutch geluk, Middle High German g(e)lücke, German Glück “fortune, good luck.”
Perhaps first borrowed in English as a gambling term. To be down on (one’s) luck is from 1832; to be in luck is from 1857; to push (one’s) luck is from 1911. Good luck as a salutation to one setting off to do something is from 1805. Expression no such luck is from 1857. Better luck next time as an expression of encouragement in the face of disappointment is from 1858, but the expression itself is older:

A gentleman was lately walking through St Giles’s, where a levelling citizen attempting to pick his pocket of a handkerchief, which the gentleman caught in time, and secured, observing to the fellow, that he had missed his aim, the latter, with perfect sang-froid, answered, “better luck next time master.”  [“Monthly Mirror,” London, 1802]

Luck of the draw (1967) is from card-playing. In expressions often ironical, as in just (my) luck (1909). To be out of luck is from 1789; to have one’s luck run out is from 1966.
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lux (n.)
unit of illumination, 1889, from Latin lux “light,” from PIE root *leuk- “light, brightness.”

lady (n.)

c. 1200, lafdilavede, from Old English hlæfdige (Northumbrian hlafdia, Mercian hlafdie), “mistress of a household, wife of a lord,” apparently literally “one who kneads bread,” from hlaf “bread” (see loaf (n.)) + -dige “maid,” which is related to dæge “maker of dough” (which is the first element in dairy; see dey (n.1)). Also compare lord (n.)). Century Dictionary finds this etymology “improbable,” and OED rates it “not very plausible with regard to sense,” but no one seems to have a better explanation.

The medial -f- disappeared 14c. The word is not found outside English except where borrowed from it. Sense of “woman of superior position in society” is c. 1200; that of “woman whose manners and sensibilities befit her for high rank in society” is from 1861 (ladylike suggesting this sense is attested from 1580s, and ladily from c. 1400). Meaning “woman chosen as an object of chivalrous love” is from early 14c. Used commonly as an address to any woman since 1890s.

Applied since Old English to the Holy Virgin, hence many extended usages in plant names, place names, etc., from genitive singular hlæfdigan, which in Middle English merged with the nominative, so that lady- often represents (Our) Lady’s, as in ladybugLady Day (late 13c.) was the festival of the Annunciation of the Virgin Mary (March 25). Ladies’ man first recorded 1784; lady-killer “man supposed to be dangerously fascinating to women” is from 1811. Lady of pleasure recorded from 1640s. Lady’s slipper as a type of orchid is from 1590s.

Diana

c. 1200, ancient Italian goddess of the moon, patroness of virginity and hunting, later identified with Greek Artemis, and through her with eastern goddesses such as Diana of Ephesus. From Late Latin Diana, on Old Latin Jana. The name is explained as *Diwjana, from *diw-yo-, from PIE root *dyeu- “to shine,” in derivatives “sky, heaven, god,” in reference to the shining moon, or from dius “godly.”

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*dyeu

Proto-Indo-European root meaning “to shine,” in derivatives “sky, heaven, god.”

It forms all or part of: adieuadiosadjournAsmodeuscircadiandeificdeifydeismdeitydeodanddeus ex machinadevadialdiaryDianaDianthusdiet (n.2) “assembly;” DioscuriDisdismaldiurnaldivaDivesdivinejossjournaljournalistjourneyJovejovialJuliaJuliusJulyJupitermeridianMidiper diempsychedelicquotidiansojournTuesdayZeus.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit deva “god” (literally “shining one”); diva “by day;” Avestan dava- “spirit, demon;” Greek delos “clear;” Latin dies “day,” deus “god;” Welsh diw, Breton deiz “day;” Armenian tiw “day;” Lithuanian dievas “god,” diena “day;” Old Church Slavonic dini, Polish dzień, Russian den “day;” Old Norse tivar “gods;” Old English Tig, genitive Tiwes, name of a god.

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“So that crazy guy had a name. A perfectly normal one. Kyle, for God’s sakeIt made things worse because it made them more real.” (Page 796, 7+9+6=22, of ’11/22/63′ Copyright 2012 by Stephen King)

Felix

masc. proper name, from Latin felix “happy” (see felicity).

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Maha Mrityunjaya Mantra

Legend has it that Lord Shiva appeared before his devotee Markandeya (who was destined to die at the age of sixteen) and stopped his aging process a few days before he was supposed to turn sixteen. Thus, death would never be able to claim him! Hence, this mantra is also referred to as the Markandeya mantra in classical Hindu studies. The mantra should ideally be repeated 108 times, twice daily, at dawn and at dusk. It is particularly useful for meditation and yoga practice.

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Meaning of the Maha Mrityunjaya Mantra

We worship Shiva – The Three-Eyed (tryambakam) Lor(yajamahe); Who is fragrant (sugandhim) and nourishes (pushti) and grows (vardhanam) all beings.

As the ripened cucumber (urvarukamiva) is automatically liberated (bandhanaan) (by the intervention of the “farmer”) from its bondage to the creeper when it fully ripens;

May He liberate us (mokshiya) from death (mrityor), for the sake of immortality (maamritaat).

We pray to Lord Shiva whose eyes are the Sun, Moon, and Fire. May he protect us from all disease, poverty, and fear And bless us with prosperity, longevity, and good health.

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Spiritual Significance of the Mahamrityunjaya Mantra

Lord Shiva is referred to as tryambakam, the three-eyed one because his third-eye has been “opened” by the powers of penance and meditation. The third eye is said to be located in the space between the eyebrows and is “opened” when one experiences a spiritual awakening. So, when we pray to Lord Shiva, we are in essence asking for his blessings and assistance in opening our third eye of spiritual knowledge.

The natural consequence of this awakening is that we will be led towards spiritual liberation or moksha, and attain freedom from the cycles of death and rebirth. The goal of chanting this mantra is to spiritually “ripen” so that Lord Shiva can free us from our bondage to all the material things that bind us! – http://www.vedicfeed.com

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Koyaanisqatsi

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Koyaanisqatsi
Directed byGodfrey Reggio
Produced byGodfrey Reggio
Written byRon FrickeMichael HoenigGodfrey ReggioAlton Walpole
Music byPhilip Glass
CinematographyRon Fricke
Edited byRon FrickeAlton Walpole
Production
company
Institute for Regional EducationAmerican Zoetrope
Distributed byIsland AliveNew Cinema
Release dateApril 28, 1982 (Santa Fe)April 27, 1983 (United States)
Running time86 minutes[1]
CountryUnited States
Box office$3.2 million[2]

Grand Central Terminal in New York City was shown several times in the film.

Koyaanisqatsi (English: /koʊˌjɑːnɪsˈkɑːtsiː/[3]), also known as Koyaanisqatsi: Life Out of Balance, is a 1982 American experimental film produced and directed by Godfrey Reggio with music composed by Philip Glass and cinematography by Ron Fricke.

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Meaning[edit]

Godfrey Reggio, director of Koyaanisqatsi and the other films in the Qatsi trilogy

Reggio stated that the Qatsi films are intended to simply create an experience and that “it is up [to] the viewer to take for himself/herself what it is that [the film] means.” He also said that “these films have never been about the effect of technology, of industry on people. It’s been that everyone: politics, education, things of the financial structure, the nation state structure, language, the culture, religion, all of that exists within the host of technology. So it’s not the effect of, it’s that everything exists within [technology]. It’s not that we use technology, we live technology. Technology has become as ubiquitous as the air we breathe …”[3]

According to Hopi Dictionary: Hopìikwa Lavàytutuveni, the Hopi word koyaanisqatsi (Hopi pronunciation: [kojɑːnisˈkɑtsi])[29] is defined as “life of moral corruption and turmoil” or “life out of balance”.[30] The prefix koyaanis– means “corrupted” or “chaotic”, and the word qatsi means “life” or “existence”,[31] literally translating koyaanisqatsi as “chaotic life”.[30] The film also defines the word as “crazy life“, “life in turmoil”, “life disintegrating”, and “a state of life that calls for another way of living”.[32]

In the score by Philip Glass, the word “Koyaanisqatsi” is chanted at the beginning and end of the film in an “otherworldly”[33] dark, sepulchral basso profondo by singer Albert de Ruiter over a solemn, four-bar organ-passacaglia bassline. Three Hopi prophecies sung by a choral ensemble during the latter part of the “Prophecies” movement are translated just prior to the end credits:

  • “If we dig precious things from the land, we will invite disaster.”
  • “Near the day of Purification, there will be cobwebs spun back and forth in the sky.”
  • “A container of ashes might one day be thrown from the sky, which could burn the land and boil the oceans.”

During the end titles, the film gives Jacques EllulIvan IllichDavid MonongyeGuy Debord, and Leopold Kohr credit for inspiration. Moreover, amongst the consultants to the director are listed such names as Jeffrey Lew, T.A. Price, Belle Carpenter, Cybelle Carpenter, Langdon Winner, and Barbara Pecarich.

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Miranda (1)

fem. proper name, fem. of Latin mirandus “worthy to be admired,” gerundive of mirari “to admire” (see miracle).

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Miranda (2)

in reference to criminal suspects’ arrest rights in U.S., 1967, from the name of rape and robbery suspect Ernesto Miranda (1941-1976) and his Fifth Amendment cases, ruled on by U.S. Supreme Court June 13, 1966, under the heading Ernesto A. Miranda v. the State of Arizona.

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M

13th letter of the English alphabet, from Greek mu, from Semitic mem. It represents a very stable and unchanging sound in Indo-European, described by Johnson as “a kind of humming inward.” The Roman symbol for 1,000; sometimes used in this sense in English 15c.-16c.; but in late 20c. newspaper headlines it stands for million. As a thickness of type, from 1680s (commonly spelled out, em).

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mid (adj.)

middle; being the middle part or midst; being between, intermediate,” Old English mid, midd from Proto-Germanic *medja- (source also of Old Norse miðr, Old Saxon middi, Old Frisian midde, Middle Dutch mydde, Old High German mitti, German mitte, Gothic midjis “mid, middle”), from PIE root *medhyo- “middle.”

Orion correlation theory – Wikipedia

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*medhyo-

Proto-Indo-European root meaning “middle.” Perhaps related to PIE root *me- (2) “to measure.”

It forms all or part of: amidintermediatemean (adj.2) “occupying a middle or intermediate place;” medalmedialmedianmediatemedievalmediocreMediterraneanmediummeridianmesicmesialmeso-mesonMesopotamiaMesozoicmezzaninemezzomezzotintmid (prep., adj.); middleMidgardmidriffmidstmidwifemilieumingemizzenmoietymullion.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit madhyah, Avestan madiya- “middle,” Greek mesos, Latin medius “in the middle, between; from the middle,” Gothic midjis, Old English midd “middle,” Old Church Slavonic medzu “between,” Armenian mej “middle.”

Entries related to *medhyo-

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Medea

Medea

In Greek mythology, Medea is the daughter of King Aeëtes of Colchis, a niece of Circe and the granddaughter of the sun god Helios. Medea figures in the myth of Jason and the Argonauts, appearing in Hesiod’s Theogony around 700 BC, but best known from Euripides’s tragedy Medea and Apollonius of Rhodes’ epic Argonautica. Medea is known in most stories as a sorceress and is often depicted as a priestess of the goddess Hecate.

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Dictionary entries near *medhyo-

meddlesome

meddling

Mede

Medea

medevac

*medhyo-

media

mediaeval

medial

medially

median

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The Flaming Lips – “All We Have Is Now” Lyrics

As logic stands you couldn’t meet a man
Who’s from the future
But logic broke as he appeared he spoke
About the future

We’re not gonna make it
He explained how the end will come
You and me were never meant to be
Part of the future

All we have is now
All we’ve ever had was now
All we have is now
All we’ll ever have is now

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I noticed that he had a watch and hat
That looked familiar
He was me from a dimension torn free
Of the future

We’re not gonna make it
He explained how the end will come
You and me were never meant to be
Part of the future

All we have is now
All we’ve ever had was now
All we have is now
All we’ll ever have is now

All we have is now

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About kylegrant76

Eye am that Eye am
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