Jake Epilogue IV: Zach Lang III: Epic Jack II: 10/08 = 8/8 mph = 108 = Dharma Initiate-Eve/ In-itiat-ive – John 9:25

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4 + 8 + 15 + 16 + 23 + 42 = 108

raise (v.)

c. 1200, “cause a rising of; lift upright, set upright; build, construct,” from a Scandinavian source, such as Old Norse reisa “to raise,” from Proto-Germanic *raizjan (source also of Gothic ur-raisjan, Old English ræran “to rear;” see rear (v.)), causative of root *ris- “to rise” (see rise (v.)). At first sharing many senses with native rear (v.1).

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Meaning “make higher” is from c. 1300 in the physical sense, as is that of “restore to life.” Of the voice, from late 14c. Meaning “increase the amount of” is from c. 1500; from 1530s of prices, etc. Meaning “to bring up” (a question, etc.) is from 1640s. Card-playing sense is from 1821. Meaning “promote the growth of” (plants, etc.) is from 1660s; sense of “foster, rear, bring up” (of children) is from 1744. Meaning “to elevate” (the consciousness) is from 1970. Related: Raisedraising.

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Ra or Re is the ancient Egyptian deity of the sun. By the Fifth Dynasty in the 25th and 24th centuries BC, he had become one of the most important gods in ancient Egyptian religion, identified primarily with the noon sun. Ra was believed to rule in all parts of the created world: the sky, the Earth, and the underworld. He was the god of the sun, order, kings, and the sky.
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Pickering [“A Vocabulary, or Collection of Words and Phrases Which Have Been Supposed to be Peculiar to the United States of America,” 1816] has a long passage on the use of raise and grow in reference to crops. He writes that in the U.S. raise is used of persons, in the sense “brought up,” but it is “never thus used in the Northern States. Bartlett [1848] adds that it “is applied in the Southern States to the breeding of negroes. It is sometimes heard at the North among the illiterate; as ‘I was raised in Connecticut,’ meaning brought up there.”

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“there is nothing so threatening to systemic evil as those willing to stand against it regardless of the consequences.”
― James W. Douglass, JFK and the Unspeakable: Why He Died and Why It Matters

rapture (n.)

c. 1600, “act of carrying off,” from Middle French rapture, from Medieval Latin raptura “seizure, rape, kidnapping,” from Latin raptus “a carrying off, abduction, snatching away; rape” (see rapt). Earliest attested use in English is of women and in 17c. it sometimes meant rape (v.), which word is a cognate of this. Sense of “spiritual ecstasy, state of mental transport” first recorded c. 1600 (raptures).

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28 (Days) + 6 (Hours) + 42 (Minutes) + 12 (Seconds) = 88

raptor (n.)

c. 1600, “ravisher, abductor,” from Latin raptor “a robber, plunderer, abductor, ravisher,” agent noun from past participle stem of rapere “to seize” (see rapid). Ornithological use is from 1873 (1823 in Latin plural Raptores).

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11/8 – 11/9
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October
late Old English, from Latin October (mensis), from octo “eight,” from PIE root *octo(u)- “eight” (see eight). The eighth month of the old Roman calendar (pre-46 B.C.E.), which began the year in March. For -ber see December. Replaced Old English winterfylleð. In Russian history, the October Revolution (in which the Bolsheviks overthrew the Provisional Government) happened Nov. 7, 1917, but because Russia had not at that time adopted the Gregorian calendar reform, this date was reckoned there (Old Style) as Oct. 25.
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(5 letters, 1 word)”Trump” = 88 (English Ordinal)

Trump88
2018211316
20 + 18 + 21 + 13 + 16 = 88 (mph)
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8 + 8 = ‘16

trump (n.1)
“playing card of a suit ranking above others,” 1520s, alteration of triumph (n.), which also was the name of a card game.
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Text TRUMP (88) to 88022
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Truman
surname, attested by 1215, literally “faithful man, trusty man.”


Harry
masc. proper name, a familiar form of Henry. Weekley takes the overwhelming number of Harris and Harrison surnames as evidence that “Harry,” not “Henry,” was the Middle English pronunciation of Henry. Compare Harriet, English equivalent of French Henriette, fem. diminutive of Henri.
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harry (v.)
Old English hergian “make war, lay waste, ravage, plunder,” the word used in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle for what the Vikings did to England, from Proto-Germanic *harjon (source also of Old Frisian urheria “lay waste, ravage, plunder,” Old Norse herja “to make a raid, to plunder,” Old Saxon and Old High German herion, German verheeren “to destroy, lay waste, devastate”). This is literally “to overrun with an army,” from Proto-Germanic *harjan “an armed force” (source also of Old English here, Old Norse herr “crowd, great number; army, troop,” Old Saxon and Old Frisian heri, Dutch heir, Old High German har, German Heer, Gothic harjis “a host, army”).
The Germanic words come from PIE root *korio- “war” also “war-band, host, army” (source also of Lithuanian karas “war, quarrel,” karias “host, army;” Old Church Slavonic kara “strife;” Middle Irish cuire “troop;” Old Persian kara “host, people, army;” Greek koiranos “ruler, leader, commander”). Weakened sense of “worry, goad, harass” is from c. 1400. Related: Harriedharrying.
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dharma (n.)
1796, in secular sense, “caste custom, right behavior;” in Buddhism and Hinduism, “moral law,” from Sanskrit, “statute, law; right, justice,” etymologically “that which is established firmly,” from PIE root *dher- “to hold firmly, support.” Compare cognate Latin firmus “strong; stable,” figuratively “constant, trusty.”

heuristic (adj.)

“serving to discover or find out,” 1821, irregular formation from Greek heuriskein “to find; find out, discover; devise, invent; get, gain, procure” (from PIE *were- (2) “to find;” cognate with Old Irish fuar “I have found”) + -istic. As a noun, from 1860. Greek had heuretikos “inventive,” also heurema “an invention, a discovery; that which is found unexpectedly.”

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  • 28 days (6 hours, 42 minutes, 12 seconds) from today (10/8 or 8/8) =
  • Thursday, November 5, 2020
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28 days (6 hours, 42 minutes, 12 seconds) from today (10/8 or 8/8) =
Thursday, November 5, 2020
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V = Letter # 22/ 2(0)2(0)
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abbot (n.)
Old English abbod “abbot,” from Latin abbatem (nominative abbas), from Greek abbas, from Aramaic (Semitic) abba, title of honor, literally “the father, my father,” emphatic state of abh “father.” Spelling with -t is a Middle English Latinization. Originally a title given to any monk, later limited to the head of a monastery. The use as a surname is perhaps ironic or a nickname. The Latin fem. abbatissa is root of abbess. Related: Abbacyabbatialabbotship.
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  1. 28 days (6 hours, 42 minutes, 12 seconds) from today (10/8 or 8/8) =
  2. Thursday, November 5, 2020

“Let both sides unite to heed in all corners of the earth the command of Isaiah—to ‘undo the heavy burdens . . . (and) let the oppressed go free.”
― James W. Douglass, JFK and the Unspeakable: Why He Died and Why It Matters

spirit (n.)

mid-13c., “animating or vital principle in man and animals,” from Anglo-French spirit, Old French espirit “spirit, soul” (12c., Modern French esprit) and directly from Latin spiritus “a breathing (respiration, and of the wind), breath; breath of a god,” hence “inspiration; breath of life,” hence “life;” also “disposition, character; high spirit, vigor, courage; pride, arrogance,” related to spirare “to breathe,” perhaps from PIE *(s)peis- “to blow” (source also of Old Church Slavonic pisto “to play on the flute”). But de Vaan says “Possibly an onomatopoeic formation imitating the sound of breathing. There are no direct cognates.”

Meaning “supernatural immaterial creature; angel, demon; an apparition, invisible corporeal being of an airy nature” is attested from mid-14c.; from late 14c. as “a ghost” (see ghost (n.)). From c. 1500 as “a nature, character”; sense of “essential principle of something” (in a non-theological context, as in Spirit of St. Louis) is attested from 1680s, common after 1800; Spirit of ’76 in reference to the qualities that sparked and sustained the American Revolution is attested by 1797 in William Cobbett’s “Porcupine’s Gazette and Daily Advertiser.”

From late 14c. in alchemy as “volatile substance; distillate;” from c. 1500 as “substance capable of uniting the fixed and the volatile elements of the philosopher’s stone.” Hence spirits “volatile substance;” sense narrowed to “strong alcoholic liquor” by 1670s. This also is the sense in spirit level (1768). Also from mid-14c. as “character, disposition; way of thinking and feeling, state of mind; source of a human desire;” in Middle English freedom of spirit meant “freedom of choice.” From late 14c. as “divine substance, divine mind, God;” also “Christ” or His divine nature; “the Holy Ghost; divine power;” also, “extension of divine power to man; inspiration, a charismatic state; charismatic power, especially of prophecy.” Also “essential nature, essential quality.” From 1580s in metaphoric sense “animation, vitality.”

According to Barnhart and OED, originally in English mainly from passages in Vulgate, where the Latin word translates Greek pneuma and Hebrew ruah. Distinction between “soul” and “spirit” (as “seat of emotions”) became current in Christian terminology (such as Greek psykhe vs. pneuma, Latin anima vs. spiritus) but “is without significance for earlier periods” [Buck]. Latin spiritus, usually in classical Latin “breath,” replaces animus in the sense “spirit” in the imperial period and appears in Christian writings as the usual equivalent of Greek pneumaSpirit-rapping is from 1852.

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  • See all related words (25) >
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Sophia
fem. proper name, from Greek sophia “skill, knowledge of, acquaintance with; sound judgment, practical wisdom; cunning, shrewdness; philosophy,” also “wisdom personified,” abstract noun from sophos “wise” (see sophist). Saint Sophia in ancient church names and place names in the East is not necessarily a reference to a person; the phrase also is the English translation of the Greek for “divine wisdom, holy wisdom,” to which churches were dedicated.

philosophy (n.)

c. 1300, philosophie, “knowledge, learning, scholarship, scholarly works, body of knowledge,” from Old French filosofie “philosophy, knowledge” (12c., Modern French philosophie) and directly from Latin philosophia, from Greek philosophia “love of knowledge, pursuit of wisdom; systematic investigation,” from philo- “loving” (see philo-) + sophia “knowledge, wisdom,” from sophis “wise, learned;” a word of unknown origin [Beekes]. With many spelling variants in Middle English (filozofie, phelosophie, etc.).

From mid-14c. as “the discipline of dealing in rational speculation or contemplation;” from late 14c. as “natural science,” also “alchemy, occult knowledge;” in the Middle Ages the word was understood to embrace all speculative sciences. Meaning “system a person forms for conduct of life” is attested from 1771. The modern sense of “the body of highest truth, the science of the most fundamental matters” is from 1794.

Nec quicquam aliud est philosophia, si interpretari velis, praeter studium sapientiae; sapientia autem est rerum divinarum et humanarum causarumque quibus eae res continentur scientia. [Cicero, “De Officiis”]

[Philosophical problems] are, of course, not empirical problems; but they are solved through an insight into the workings of our language, and that in such a way that these workings are recognized — despite an urge to misunderstand them. The problems are solved, not through the contribution of new knowledge, rather through the arrangement of things long familiar. Philosophy is a struggle against the bewitchment (Verhexung) of our understanding by the resources of our language. [Ludwig Wittgenstein, “Philosophical Investigations,” 1953]

VALIS by PKD (Page 209) “Sophia is two,” Linda said. “She was born in 1976. We tape what she says.” “Everything is taped,” Mini said. “Sophia is surrounded by audio and video recording equipment that automatically monitors her constantly. Not for her protection, of course; VALIS protects her – VALIS, her father.”

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zeitgeist (n.)
1848, from German Zeitgeist (Herder, 1769), “spirit of the age,” literally “timespirit,” from Zeit “time” (from Proto-Germanic *tidiz “division of time,” from PIE root *da- “to divide”) + Geist “spirit” (see ghost (n.)). Carlyle has it as a German word in “Sartor Resartus” (1840) and translates it as “TimeSpirit.”
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Athena
Greek goddess of wisdom, skill in the arts, righteous warfare, etc., from Latin Athena, from Greek Athēnē, name of a common Greek goddess, dating to Minoan times, depicted with a snake and protecting the palace. “Like the goddess itself, the name is pre-Greek” [Beekes]. Identified by the Romans with their Minerva.
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Benjamin
masc. proper name, in Old Testament, Jacob’s youngest son (Genesis xxxv.18), from Hebrew Binyamin, literally “son of the south,” though interpreted in Genesis as “son of the right hand,” from ben “son of” + yamin “right hand,” also “south” (in an East-oriented culture). Compare Arabic cognate yaman “right hand, right side, south;” yamana “he was happy,” literally “he turned to the right.”
The right was regarded as auspicious (see left and dexterity). Also see Yemensouthpaw, and compare deasil “rightwise, turned toward the right,” from Gaelic deiseil “toward the south; toward the right,” from deas “right, right-hand; south.” Also compare Sanskrit dakshina “right; south,” and Welsh go-gledd “north,” literally “left.”
In reference to a favorite younger son it is from the story of Jacob’s family in Genesis. With familiar forms BenjyBenny. Slang meaning “money” (by 1999) is from the portrait of Founding Father Benjamin Franklin on U.S. $100 bill. In some old uses in herb-lore, etc., it is a folk-etymology corruption of benzoin.
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Dexter
masc. proper name, from Latin dexter “on the right hand” (from PIE root *deks- “right, opposite of left; south”). See dexter (adj.) and compare also Benjamin.
The English surname, however, is literally “a dyer,” attested from c. 1300, from a variant of deie “dye” (see dye (n.)) + feminine agent suffix -ster. Its immediate source is Old English degstre, from deagian “to dye.” The parallel form in Middle English was deister “dyer” attested from c. 1300, from 13c. as a surname (Deyster, Dygestre).
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trumpet (n.)
late 14c., from Old French trompette “trumpet,” diminutive of trompe (see trump (n.2)).
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dexterity (n.)
1520s, “manual skill, skill in using the hands; physical adroitness in general,” from Middle French dexterité (16c.), from Latin dexteritatem (nominative dexteritas) “readiness, skillfulness, prosperity,” from dexter “skillful,” also “right (hand),” from PIE root *deks- “right, on the right hand,” also “south.” Compare dexter. In 16c.-18c. also “mental adroitness or skill,” often in a bad sense, “cleverness in taking advantage or avoiding responsibility.”
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pineal (adj.)
1680s, in reference to the gland in the brain, from French pinéal, literally “like a pine cone,” from Latin pinea “pine cone,” from pinus “pine tree” (see pine (n.)).
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witchcraft (n.)
Old English wiccecræft “witchcraft, magic,” from wicce (see witch) + cræft “power, skill” (see craft). Witchcraft was declared a crime in English law in 1542; trials there peaked in 1580s and 1640s but fell sharply after 1660. The last, in 1717, ended in acquittal. The Witchcraft Act was repealed 1736.
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Witch Hysteria From June 10 through September 22, 1692, Salem, Massachusetts experienced a witch hysteria. Over the 15 week period, 19 men and women were hanged for , and more than 100 accused people were jailed. Although some believed the cause for hysteria was a factor such as ergot poisoning, the cause was actually class division.

Wicca (n.)

An Old English masc. noun meaning “male witch, wizard, soothsayer, sorcerer, astrologer, magician;” see witch. Use of the word in modern contexts traces to English folklorist Gerald Gardner (1884-1964), who is said to have joined circa 1939 an occult group in New Forest, Hampshire, England, for which he claimed an unbroken tradition to medieval times. Gardner seems to have first used it in print in 1954, in his book “Witchcraft Today” (“Witches were the Wica or wise people, with herbal

knowledge and a working occult teaching usually used for good ….”). In published and unpublished material, he apparently only ever used the word as a mass noun referring to adherents of the practice and not as the name of the practice itself. Some of his followers continue to use it in this sense. According to Gardner’s book “The Meaning of Witchcraft” (1959), the word, as used in the initiation ceremony, played a key role in his experience:

I realised that I had stumbled upon something interesting; but I was half-initiated before the word, ‘Wica’ which they used hit me like a thunderbolt, and I knew where I was, and that the Old Religion still existed. And so I found myself in the Circle, and there took the usual oath of secrecy, which bound me not to reveal certain things.

In the late 1960s the term came into use as the title of a modern pagan movement associated with witchcraft. The first printed reference in this usage seems to be 1969, in “The Truth About Witchcraft” by freelance author Hans Holzer:

If the practice of the Old Religion, which is also called Wicca (Craft of the Wise), and thence, witchcraft, is a reputable and useful cult, then it is worthy of public interest.

And, quoting witch Alex Sanders:

“No, a witch wedding still needs a civil ceremony to make it legal. Wicca itself as a religion is not registered yet. But it is about time somebody registered it, I think. I’ve done all I can to call attention to our religion.”

Sanders was a highly visible representative of neo-pagan Witchcraft in the late 1960s and early 1970s. During this time he appears to have popularized use of the term in this sense. Later books c. 1989 teaching modernized witchcraft using the same term account for its rise and popularity, especially in U.S.

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witness (n.)

Old English witnes “attestation of fact, event, etc., from personal knowledge;” also “one who so testifies;” originally “knowledge, wit,” formed from wit (n.) + -ness. Christian use (late 14c.) is as a literal translation of Greek martys (see martyr). Witness stand is recorded from 1853.

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radioactive (adj.)
1898, from French radio-actif, coined by Pierre and Marie Curie from radio-, combining form of Latin radius (see radiation) + actif “active” (see active).
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“The international relinquishing of sovereignty would have to spring from the people—”
― James W. Douglass, JFK and the Unspeakable: Why He Died and Why It Matters

Nina
fem. proper name; in a Russian context it is a shortening of Annina, diminutive of Greek Anna. In a Spanish context, Niña “child, infant,” a nursery word.
Karen (2)
fem. proper name, Danish shortened form of Katherine. Rare before 1928; a top-10 name for girls born in the U.S. 1951-1968.

“Hello, Karen!

I am the voice of the forest!”

“The Ash Yggdrasil” (1886) by Friedrich Wilhelm Heine

Yggdrasil (from Old Norse Yggdrasill) is an immense mythical tree that plays a central role in Norse cosmology, where it connects the Nine Worlds. Yggdrasil is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson.

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ancestry (n.)
“series or line of ancestors, descent from ancestors,” early 14c., auncestrie, from Old French ancesserie “ancestry, ancestors, forefathers,” from ancestre (see ancestor); spelling modified in English by influence of ancestor.

“What you make from a tree should be at least as miraculous as what you cut down.”
― Richard Powers, The Overstory

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Wooden baseball bat used as a prop in the 1984 movie “The Natural” starring Robert Redford. The bat has the word “Wonderboy” printed on it in black lettering with a black lightning bolt shape. In the film, the character Roy Hobbs uses this bat in batting practice after being signed to the New York Knights as a middle-aged rookie.
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Rachel
fem. proper name, biblical daughter of Laban and wife of Jacob, from Late Latin, from Greek Rhakhel, from Hebrew (Semitic) Rahel, literally “ewe” (compare Arabic rahil, Aramaic rahla, Akkadian lahru, a metathesized form).
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root (n.)
“underground part of a plant,” late Old English rot, from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse rot “root,” figuratively “cause, origin,” from Proto-Germanic *wrot (source also of Old English wyrt “root, herb, plant,” Old High German wurz, German Wurz “a plant,” Gothic waurts “a root,” with characteristic Scandinavian loss of -w- before -r-), from PIE root *wrād- “branch, root.” The usual Old English words for “root” were wyrttruma and wyrtwala.
Figurative use is from c. 1200. Of teeth, hair, etc., from early 13c. Mathematical sense is from 1550s. Philological sense from 1520s. Slang meaning “penis” is recorded from 1846. In African-American vernacular use, “a spell effected by magical properties of roots,” 1935. To take root is from 1530s. Root beer, made from the extracts of various roots, first recorded 1841, American English; root doctor is from 1821. Root cap is from 1875.
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switch (n.)
1590s, “slender riding whip,” probably from a Flemish or Low German word akin to Middle Dutch swijch “bough, twig,” or swutsche, variant of Low German zwukse “long thin stick, switch,” from Germanic *swih- (source also of Old High German zwec “wooden peg,” German Zweck “aim, design,” originally “peg as a target,” Zwick “wooden peg”), perhaps connected with PIE root *swei- (2) “to swing, bend, to turn.”
The meaning “device for changing the direction of something or making or breaking a connection” is first recorded 1797. “The peg sense suits the mech(anical) applications” [Weekley]; also compare switchblade. These senses in English might be a direct borrowing from those senses in Continental Germanic languages rather than a continuation of the “pliant wand” sense. The meaning “a change from one to another, a reversal, an exchange, a substitution” is first recorded 1920; extended form switcheroo is by 1933.
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frazzle (v.)
c. 1825, “to unravel” (of clothing), from East Anglian variant of 17c. fasel “to unravel, fray” (as the end of a rope), from Middle English facelyn “to fray” (mid-15c.), from fasylle “fringe, frayed edge,” diminutive of Old English fæs “fringe, border.” Related: Frazzledfrazzling. Compare German Faser “thread, fiber, filament,” Middle Dutch vese “fringe, fiber, chaff.” Probably influenced in form by fray (v.).
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Micah
masc. proper name, sixth of the Old Testament prophets, from Hebrew Mikhah, short for Mikhayah, literally “who is like the Lord?” The first element identical to that in Michael; for the second element, see Jah.
  1. 28 days (6 hours, 42 minutes, 12 seconds) from today (10/8 or 8/8) =
  2. Thursday, November 5, 2020
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crater (n.)
1610s, “bowl-shaped mouth of a volcano,” from a specialized use of Latin crater, from Greek krater “large bowl from which red wine mixed with water was served to guests,” from kera- “to mix,” from PIE root *kere- “to mix, confuse; cook” (see rare (adj.2)).
The extension to volcanoes began in Latin. The literal classical sense is attested in English from 1730. Applied to asteroid scars on the moon since 1831 (they originally were thought to be volcanic) and later extended to other planets. Meaning “cavity formed by the explosion of a military mine” is from 1839. The Battle of the Crater in the U.S. Civil War was July 30, 1864.
As a verb, “having a crater or craters,” by 1848 in poetry, 1872 in scientific writing. Related: Crateredcratering.
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“War will exist until that distant day when the conscientious objector enjoys the same reputation and prestige that the warrior does today.”
― James W. Douglass, JFK and the Unspeakable: Why He Died and Why It Matters

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The ouroboros or uroboros (/ˌ(j)ʊərəˈbɒrəs/, also UK:, US:) is an ancient symbol depicting a serpent or dragon eating its own tail. Originating in ancient Egyptian iconography, the ouroboros entered western tradition via Greek magical tradition and was adopted as a symbol in Gnosticism and Hermeticism and most notably in alchemy. The term derives from Ancient Greek οὐροβόρος, from οὐρά oura ‘tail’ plus -βορός -boros ‘-eating’. The ouroboros is often interpreted as a symbol for eternal cyclic renewal or a cycle of life, death, and rebirth. The skin-sloughing process of snakes symbolizes the transmigration of souls, the snake biting its own tail is a fertility symbol. The tail of the snake is a phallic symbol, the mouth is a yonic or womb-like symbol.
Ouroboros – Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ouroboros


Eros (n.)
god of love, late 14c., from Greek eros (plural erotes), “god or personification of love,” literally “love,” from eran “to love,” erasthai “to love, desire,” which is of uncertain origin.
Freudian sense of “urge to self-preservation and sexual pleasure” is from 1922. Ancient Greek distinguished four ways of love: erao “to be in love with, to desire passionately or sexually;” phileo “have affection for;” agapao “have regard for, be contented with;” and stergo, used especially of the love of parents and children or a ruler and his subjects.


rose (n.2)
light red wine, 1897, from French vin rosé, literally “pink wine.”
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biff (v.)
“to hit,” 1877, imitative (as a sound effect by 1847). Related: Biffedbiffing. As a noun, attested from 1881.
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Back and to the left . . . Back and to the left . . . Back and to the left . . . Back and to the left . . .
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“If we go as far as we can into the darkness, regardless of the consequences, I believe a midnight truth will free us from our bondage to violence and bring us to the light of peace.”
― James W. Douglass, JFK and the Unspeakable: Why He Died and Why It Matters

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rare (adj.1)
“unusual,” late 14c., “thin, airy, porous;” mid-15c., “few in number and widely separated, sparsely distributed, seldom found;” from Old French rere “sparse” (14c.), from Latin rarus “thinly sown, having a loose texture; not thick; having intervals between, full of empty spaces,” from PIE *ra-ro-, from root *ere- “to separate; adjoin” (source also of Sanskrit rte “besides, except,” viralah “distant, tight, rare;” Old Church Slavonic rediku “rare,” Old Hittite arhaš “border,” Lithuanian irti “to be dissolved”). “Few in number,” hence, “unusual.” Related: Rareness. In chemistry, rare earth is from 1818.
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melrose (n.)
“honey of roses,” 1790, from modern Latin mel rosae, from mel “honey” (from PIE root *melit-) + rosae, genitive of rosa “rose” (see rose (n.)).
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green (adj.)
Old English grene, Northumbrian groene “green, of the color of living plants,” in reference to plants, “growing, living, vigorous,” also figurative, of a plant, “freshly cut,” of wood, “unseasoned” earlier groeni, from Proto-Germanic *grōni- (source also of Old Saxon grani, Old Frisian grene, Old Norse grænn, Danish grøn, Dutch groen, Old High German gruoni, German grün), from PIE root *ghre- “grow” (see grass), through sense of “color of growing plants.”
From c. 1200 as “covered with grass or foliage.” From early 14c. of fruit or vegetables, “unripe, immature;” and of persons, “of tender age, youthful, immature, inexperienced;” hence “gullible, immature with regard to judgment” (c. 1600). From mid-13c. in reference to the skin or complexion of one sick.
Green cheese originally was that which is new or fresh (late 14c.), later with reference to coloring; for the story told to children that the moon is made of it, see cheese (n.1). Green light in figurative sense of “permission” is from 1937 (green and red as signals on railways first attested 1883, as nighttime substitutes for semaphore flags). Green thumb for “natural for gardening” is by 1938. Green beret originally “British commando” is from 1949. Greenroom (also green room) “room for actors when not on stage” is from 1701; presumably a once-well-known one was painted green. The color of environmentalism since 1971.
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spine (n.)
c. 1400, “backbone,” later “thornlike part” (early 15c.), from Old French espine “thorn, prickle; backbone, spine” (12c., Modern French épine), from Latin spina “backbone,” originally “thorn, prickle” (figuratively, in plural, “difficulties, perplexities”), from PIE *spe-ina-, from root *spei- “sharp point” (see spike (n.1)). Meaning “the back of a book” is first attested 1922.
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pine (n.)
“coniferous tree, tree of the genus Pinus,” Old English pin (in compounds), from Old French pin and directly from Latin pinus “pine, pine-tree, fir-tree,” which is perhaps from a PIE *pi-nu-, from root *peie- “to be fat, swell” (see fat (adj.)).

If so, the tree’s name would be a reference to its sap or pitch. Compare Sanskrit pituh “juice, sap, resin,” pitudaruh “pine tree,” Greek pitys “pine tree.” Also see pitch (n.1). The native Old English word was furh (see fir). Pine-top “cheap illicit whiskey,” is attested by 1858, Southern U.S. slang.
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Most of us have wished vaguely & vainly at times that they knew a fir from a pine. As the Scotch fir is not a fir strictly speaking, but a pine, & as we shall continue to ignore this fact, it is plain that the matter concerns the botanist more than the man in the street. [Fowler]
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cheese (n.1)
curd of milk coagulated, separated from the whey, pressed and used as food, Old English cyse (West Saxon), cese (Anglian) “cheese,” from West Germanic *kasjus (source also of Old Saxon kasi, Old High German chasi, German Käse, Middle Dutch case, Dutch kaas), from Latin caseus “cheese” (source of Italian cacio, Spanish queso, Irish caise, Welsh caws).

Of unknown origin; perhaps from a PIE root *kwat- “to ferment, become sour” (source also of Prakrit chasi “buttermilk;” Old Church Slavonic kvasu “leaven; fermented drink,” kyselu “sour,” -kyseti “to turn sour;” Czech kysati “to turn sour, rot;” Sanskrit kvathati “boils, seethes;” Gothic hwaþjan “foam”). But de Vaan writes, “no etymology can be found which does not require some poorly-founded assumptions,” and suggests a loan-word. Also compare fromage. Old Norse ostr, Danish ost, Swedish ost are related to Latin ius “broth, sauce, juice.”

Earliest references would be to compressed curds of milk used as food; pressed or molded cheeses with rinds are from 14c. Transferred to other cheese-like substances by 1530s. As a photographer’s word to make subjects hold a smile, it is attested from 1930, but in a reminiscence of schoolboy days, which suggests an earlier use. Probably for the forced smile involved in making the -ee- sound.

Green cheese is that newly made; the notion that the moon is made of green cheese as a type of a ridiculous assertion is from 1520s. To make cheeses (1835) was a schoolgirls’ amusement of wheeling rapidly so one’s petticoats blew out in a circle then dropping down so they came to rest inflated and resembling a wheel of cheese; hence, used figuratively for “a deep curtsy.”
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Scorpio (n.)
zodiacal constellation, late 14c., from Latin scorpio (poetic scorpius) “scorpion,” also the zodiac constellation (see scorpion). The meaning “person born under or ruled by the sign of Scorpio” is recorded from 1968. Since 1922 the official (International Astronomical Union) scientific designation of the constellation has been Scorpius, leaving Scorpio to astrology.


holy (adj.)
Old English halig “holy, consecrated, sacred; godly; ecclesiastical,” from Proto-Germanic *hailaga- (source also of Old Norse heilagr, Danish hellig, Old Frisian helich “holy,” Old Saxon helag, Middle Dutch helich, Old High German heilag, German heilig, Gothic hailags “holy”), from PIE *kailo- “whole, uninjured” (see health). Adopted at conversion for Latin sanctus.
Primary (pre-Christian) meaning is not possible to determine, but probably it was “that must be preserved whole or intact, that cannot be transgressed or violated,” and connected with Old English hal (see health) and Old High German heil “health, happiness, good luck” (source of the German salutation Heil). Holy water was in Old English.
Holy has been used as an intensifying word from 1837; in expletives since 1880s (such as holy smoke, 1883, holy mackerel, 1876, holy cow, 1914, holy moly etc.), most of them euphemisms for holy Christ or holy MosesHoly Ghost was in Old English (in Middle English often written as one word). Holy League is used of various European alliances; the Holy Alliance was that formed personally by the sovereigns of Russia, Austria, and Prussia in 1815; it ended in 1830.


scorch (v.)
“to burn superficially or slightly, but so as to change the color or injure the texture,” early 14c., perhaps an alteration of scorrcnenn “make dry, parch” (c. 1200), of obscure origin, perhaps from Old Norse skorpna “to be shriveled,” cognate with Old English scrimman “to shrink, dry up.” Or perhaps from Old French escorchier “to strip off the skin,” from Vulgar Latin *excorticare “to flay,” from ex- (see ex-) + Latin cortex (genitive corticis) “cork;” but OED finds this not likely. Scorched earth military strategy is 1937, translation of Chinese jiaotu, used against the Japanese in a bid to stem their advance into China.


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even (adj.)
Old English efen “level,” also “equal, like; calm, harmonious; equally; quite, fully; namely,” from Proto-Germanic *ebna- (source also of Old Saxon eban, Old Frisian even “level, plain, smooth,” Dutch even, Old High German eban, German eben, Old Norse jafn, Danish jævn, Gothic ibns). The adverb is Old English efne “exactly, just, likewise.” Modern adverbial sense (introducing an extreme case of something more generally implied) seems to have arisen 16c. from use of the word to emphasize identity (“Who, me?” “Even you”).
Etymologists are uncertain whether the original sense was “level” or “alike.” Used extensively in Old English compounds, with a sense of “fellow, co-” (as in efeneald “of the same age;” Middle English even-sucker “foster-brother”). Of numbers, from 1550s. Sense of “on an equal footing” is from 1630s. Rhyming reduplication phrase even steven is attested from 1866; even break (n.) first recorded 1907. Even-tempered from 1712. To get even with “retaliate upon” is attested by 1833.


scorpion (n.)
c. 1200, from Old French scorpion (12c.), from Latin scorpionem (nominative scorpio), extended form of scorpius, from Greek skorpios “a scorpion,” from PIE root *(s)ker- (1) “to cut” (see shear (v.)). The Spanish alacran “scorpion” is from Arabic al-‘aqrab.


Halloween (n.)
also Hallow-e’enHallow e’en, 1781, in a Scottish context, the word and the magical lore about the date were popularized by Burns’ poem (1785, and he attached a footnote explaining it), but it probably dates to 17c. in Scotland and is attested as the name of a tune in 1724. The tune is mentioned again in an English-Scots songbook (“The Chearful Companion”) in 1783, and Burns was not the first to describe the customs in print.

Hallow-E’en, or Holy Eve, is the evening previous to the celebration of All Saints. That it is propitious to the rites of divination, is an opinion still common in many parts of Scotland. [John Main, footnote to his poem “Hallow-E’en,” Glasgow, 1783]

It is a Scottish shortening of Allhallow-even “Eve of All Saints, last night of October” (1550s), the last night of the year in the old Celtic calendar, where it was Old Year’s Night, a night for witches. A pagan holiday given a cursory baptism. Otherwise obsolete hallow (n.) “holy person, saint,” is from the source of hallow (v.). Also see even (n.), and compare hallowsHallow-day for “All-Saints Day” is from 1590s; earlier was halwemesse day (late 13c.).


Judas
biblical betrayer of Christ, Latin form of Greek Ioudas, from Hebrew Yehudha (see Judah). He was supposed to have had red hair. As a name for a malicious traitor, it is attested from late 15c. Judas priest as an exclamation in place of “Jesus Christ” is from 1914. Judas tree (1660s) supposedly was the type from which Judas hanged himself. The Judas goat (1941) leads sheep to the shackling pen.


November
c. 1200, from Old French novembre and directly from Latin November (also Novembris (mensis)), from novem “nine” (see nine). The ninth month of the Roman calendar, which began in March. For -ber see December. In Old English, it was Blotmonað “month of sacrifice,” literally “blood-month,” the time when the early Saxons prepared for winter by sacrificing animals, which they then butchered and stored for food.


eve (n.)
c. 1200, eve “evening,” especially the time between sunset and darkness, from Old English æfen, with loss of terminal -n (which, though forming part of the stem, perhaps was mistaken for an inflection), from Proto-Germanic *æbando- (source also of Old Saxon aband, Old Frisian ewnd, Dutch avond, Old High German aband, German Abend, Old Norse aptann, Danish aften), which is of uncertain origin. Now superseded in its original sense by evening.
Specific meaning “day before a saint’s day or festival” is from late 13c. Transferred sense of “the moment right before any event, etc.” is by 1780. Even (n.), evening keep the original form.


Eve
fem. proper name, Biblical first woman, Late Latin, from Hebrew (Semitic) Hawwah, literally “a living being,” from base hawa “he lived” (compare Arabic hayya, Aramaic hayyin).

Like most of the explanations of names in Genesis, this is probably based on folk etymology or an imaginative playing with sound. … In the Hebrew here, the phonetic similarity is between hawah, “Eve,” and the verbal root hayah, “to live.” It has been proposed that Eve’s name conceals very different origins, for it sounds suspiciously like the Aramaic word for “serpent.” [Robert Alter, “The Five Books of Moses,” 2004, commentary on Genesis iii.20]


amber (n.)
mid-14c., ambre grice “ambergris; perfume made from ambergris,” from the phrase in Old French (13c.) and Medieval Latin, from Arabic ‘anbar “ambergris, morbid secretion of sperm-whale intestines used in perfumes and cookery” (see ambergris), which was introduced in the West at the time of the Crusades. Arabic -nb- often is pronounced “-mb-.”

In Europe, amber was extended to fossil resins from the Baltic (late 13c. in Anglo-Latin; c. 1400 in English), and this has become the main sense as the use of ambergris has waned. Perhaps the perceived connection is that both were found washed up on seashores. Or perhaps it is a different word entirely, of unknown origin. Formerly they were distinguished as white or yellow amber for the Baltic fossil resin and ambergris “gray amber;” French distinguished the two substances as ambre gris and ambre jaune.
Remarkable for its static electricity properties, Baltic amber was known to the Romans as electrum (compare electric). Amber as an adjective in English is from c. 1500; as a color name 1735. In the Old Testament it translates Hebrew chashmal, a shining metal.


reaper (n.)
Old English ripere, agent noun from reap (v.). As the name of a personification of death, from 1839.


ember (n.)
“small, live coal,” Old English æmerge “ember,” merged with or influenced by Old Norse eimyrja, both from Proto-Germanic *aim-uzjon- “ashes” (source also of Middle Low German emere, Old High German eimuria, German Ammern); a compound from *aima- “ashes” (from PIE root *ai- (2) “to burn;” see edifice) + *uzjo- “to burn” (from PIE root *heus- “to burn;” source also of Sanskrit osati “to burn, scorch,” usna- “hot;” Greek euo “to singe;” Latin urere “to burn, singe;” Old Norse usli, Old English ysle “hot ashes,” Old Norse ysja “fire”). The -b- is unetymological.


re-appear (v.)
also reappear, 1610s, from re- “back, again” + appear. Related: Reappearedreappearing.


Judy
pet form of Judith. Figurative uses often are from the Punch and Judy puppet show.

harvest (n.)

Old English hærfest “autumn,” as one of the four seasons, “period between August and November,” from Proto-Germanic *harbitas (source also of Old Saxon hervist, Old Frisian and Dutch herfst, German Herbst “autumn,” Old Norse haust “harvest”), from PIE root *kerp- “to gather, pluck, harvest.”

In Old English and Middle English primarily a season name, with only an implied reference to the gathering of crops. The borrowing of autumn and the use of fall (n.) in a seasonal sense gradually focused the meaning of harvest to “the time of gathering crops” (mid-13c.), also to the action itself and the product of the action (after c. 1300), which became its main senses after 14c. Figurative use by 1530s. As an adjective from late 14c. Harvest home (1570s) was a festive celebration of the bringing home the last of the harvest; harvest moon (1704) is that which is full within a fortnight of the autumnal equinox.

judge (v.)
c. 1200, iugen, “examine, appraise, make a diagnosis;” c. 1300, “to form an opinion about; inflict penalty upon, punish; try (someone) and pronounce sentence,” also intransitive, “make a decision, decide, think, suppose;” from Anglo-French juger, Old French jugier “to judge, pronounce judgment; pass an opinion on” (10c., Modern French juger), from Latin iudicare “to judge, to examine officially; form an opinion upon; pronounce judgment,” from iudicem (nominative iudex) “a judge,” a compound of ius “right, law” (see just (adj.)) + root of dicere “to say” (from PIE root *deik- “to show,” also “pronounce solemnly”).
Related: Judgedjudging. Spelling with -dg- emerged mid-15c. The Old English word was deman (see doom (n.)). The Latin word also is the source of Spanish juzgar, Italian giudicare.


Sagittarius (n.) =
zodiac constellation, late Old English, from Latin, literally “archer,” properly “pertaining to arrows,” from sagitta “arrow,” which probably is from a pre-Latin Mediterranean language. Meaning “person born under Sagittarius” (properly Sagittarian) is attested from 1940. It represents a centaur drawing a bow, but to modern observers unfamiliar with either it looks vaguely like a teapot.

sag (v.)
late 14c., possibly from a Scandinavian source related to Old Norse sokkva “to sink,” or from Middle Low German sacken “to settle, sink” (as dregs in wine), from denasalized derivative of Proto-Germanic base *senkwanan “to sink” (see sink (v.)). A general North Sea Germanic word (compare Dutch zakken, Swedish sacka, Danish sakke). Of body parts from 1560s; of clothes from 1590s. Related: Saggedsagging.

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Taurus (n.)
zodiac constellation, late Old English, from Latin taurus “bull, bullock, steer,” also the name of the constellation, from PIE *tau-ro- “bull” (source also of Greek tauros, Old Church Slavonic turu “bull, steer;” Lithuanian tauras “aurochs;” Old Prussian tauris “bison”); from PIE *tauro- “bull,” from root *(s)taeu- “stout, standing, strong” (source also of Sanskrit sthura- “thick, compact,” Avestan staora- “big cattle,” Middle Persian stor “horse, draft animal,” Gothic stiur “young bull,” Old English steor); extended form of root *sta- “to stand, make or be firm.”
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December (n.)
“twelfth and last (by modern reckoning) month of the calendar, the month of the winter solstice,” late Old English, from Old French decembre, from Latin December, from decem “ten” (from PIE root *dekm- “ten”); tenth month of the old Roman calendar, which began with March.
The -ber in four Latin month names is probably from -bris, an adjectival suffix. Tucker thinks that the first five months were named for their positions in the agricultural cycle, and “after the gathering in of the crops, the months were merely numbered.”

If the word contains an element related to mensis, we must assume a *decemo-membris (from *-mensris). October must then be by analogy from a false division Sep-tem-ber &c. Perhaps, however, from *de-cem(o)-mr-is, i.e. “forming the tenth part or division,” from *mer- …, while October = *octuo-mr-is. [T.G. Tucker, “Etymological Dictionary of Latin”]

Decembrist, in Russian history in reference to the insurrection against Nicholas I in December 1825, is by 1868 in English, translating Russian dekabrist, from dekabr’ “December.”


deception (n.)
early 15c., decepcioun, “act of misleading, a lie, a falsehood,” from Old French déception (13c., decepcion) or directly from Late Latin deceptionem (nominative deceptio) “a deceiving,” noun of state or action from past-participle stem of Latin decipere “to ensnare, take in, beguile, cheat,” from de “from” or pejorative (see de-) + capere “to take,” from PIE root *kap- “to grasp.”
From mid-15c. as “state of being deceived; error, mistake;” from 1794 as “artifice, cheat, that which deceives.”


decapitation (n.)
1640s, “act or fact of decapitating or being decapitated,” from French décapitation, from Medieval Latin decapitationem (nominative decapitatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Late Latin decapitare, from Latin de “off” (see de-) + caput (genitive capitis) “head” (from PIE root *kaput- “head”). In U.S. political slang, “summary removal from office,” 1869.


Capricorn
zodiac sign represented as a goat, or half-goat half-fish, late Old English, from Latin Capricornus, literally “horned like a goat,” from caper (genitive capri) “goat” (see cab) + cornu “horn,” from PIE root *ker- (1) “horn; head.” A loan-translation of Greek Aigokheros, the name of the constellation. Extended 1894 to persons born under the sign.


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remember (v.)
mid-14c., remembren, “keep (something or someone) in mind, retain in the memory,” from Old French remembrer “remember, recall, bring to mind” (11c.), from Latin rememorari “recall to mind, remember,” from re- “again” (see re-) + memorari “be mindful of,” from memor “mindful” (from PIE root *(s)mer- (1) “to remember”).

Meaning “recall to mind” is late 14c.; sense of “to mention” is from 1550s. Also in Middle English “to remind” (someone), “bring back the memory of” (something to someone); “give an account, narrate.” An Anglo-Saxon verb for it was gemunan. The insertion of -b- between -m- and a following consonant (especially where a vowel has dropped out) is regular: compare number (n.), chamber (n.), humble (adj.).


treacherous (adj.)
early 14c., from Old French trecherostricheros “deceitful” (12c.), from trecheortricheor “cheat, deceiver, liar, impostor, trickster,” agent noun from trechiertrichier “to cheat, trick” (see trick (n.)). Figuratively, of things, from c. 1600. Related: Treacherouslytreacherousness. Middle English had treacher “deceiver, cheat, traitor.”

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melatonin (n.)
chemical formed in the pineal gland of mammals that regulates certain physiological activities, 1958, from Greek melas “black, dark” (see melano-) + ending from serotonin. So called because its secretion is inhibited by sunlight, or because it changes the skin color of certain reptiles and amphibians.


Krishna
eighth avatar of Vishnu, 1793, from Sanskrit krshnah, literally “the Black One,” from PIE *kers-no-, suffixed form of root *kers- “dark, dirty” (source also of Old Church Slavonic crunu, Russian coron, Serbo-Croatian crn, Czech cerny, Old Prussian kirsnan “black,” Lithuanian keršas “black and white, variegated”).


Christmas (n.)
“Church festival observed annually in memory of the birth of Christ,” late Old English Cristes mæsse, from Christ (and retaining the original vowel sound) + mass (n.2).
Written as one word from mid-14c. As a verb, “to celebrate Christmas,” from 1590s. Father Christmas first attested in a carol attributed to Richard Smart, Rector of Plymtree (Devon) from 1435-77. Christmas-tree in modern sense first attested 1835 in American English, from German Weihnachtsbaum. Christmas cards were first designed 1843, popular by 1860s; the phrase Christmas-card was in use by 1850. Christmas-present is from 1769. Christmas Eve is Middle English Cristenmesse Even (c. 1300).
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mnemonic (adj.)
1753, “aiding the memory, intended to assist the memory;” 1825, “pertaining to the memory,” a back-formation from mnemonics, or from a Latinized form of Greek mnēmonikos “of or pertaining to memory,” from mnēmōn (genitive mnēmonos) “remembering, mindful,” from mnēmē “memory, a remembrance, record, an epitaph; memory as a mental faculty,” from base of mnasthai “remember,” from PIE root *men- (1) “to think.” The noun meaning “mnemonic device” is from 1858. Related: Mnemonical (1660s)
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saturnalia (n.)

time of merrymaking, 1590s, from Latin Saturnalia, ancient Roman festivals of Saturn (held in December), a time of merrymaking for all, from neuter plural of adjective Saturnalis “pertaining to Saturn,” from Saturnus (see Saturn). They correspond to the Greek Kronia. The extended sense of “period of unrestrained revelry” is first attested 1782. Related: Saturnalian.

Saturday (n.)

seventh day of the week, Old English sæterdægsæternesdæg, literally “day of the planet Saturn,” from Sæternes (genitive of Sætern; see Saturn) + Old English dæg (see day). Partial loan-translation of Latin Saturni dies “Saturn’s day” (compare Dutch Zaterdag, Old Frisian Saterdi, Middle Low German Satersdach; Irish dia Sathuirn, Welsh dydd Sadwrn). The Latin word itself is a loan-translation of Greek kronou hēmera, literally “the day of Cronus.”

Unlike other English day names, no god substitution seems to have been attempted, perhaps because the northern European pantheon lacks a clear corresponding figure to Roman Saturn. A homely ancient Nordic custom, however, seems to be preserved in Old Norse laugardagr, Danish lørdag, Swedish lördag “Saturday,” literally “bath day” (Old Norse laug “bath”).

German Samstag (Old High German sambaztag) appears to be from a Greek *sambaton, a nasalized colloquial form of sabbaton “sabbath,” also attested in Old Church Slavonic sabota, Polish sobota, Russian subbota, Hungarian szombat, French samedi.

Saturday night has been used figuratively to suggest “drunkenness and looseness in relations between the young men and young women” at least since mid-19c. Saturday-night special “cheap, low-caliber handgun” is American English, attested from 1976 (earlier Saturday-night pistol, 1929).

deus (n.)

“God, a god,” mid-13c. in French and Latin salutations and exclamations in English works, see Zeus. Never nativized, but it continued to appear in adopted Latin expressions such as deus absconditus “hidden god,” and deus ex machina “a power, event, person, or thing that arrives conveniently to solve a difficulty (especially in a play or novel). This (1690s) is from a Modern Latin translation of Greek apo mekhanes theos, literally “the god from the machina,” the name of the device by which “gods” were suspended over the stage in Greek theater, from Greek (Attic) mēkhanē “device, tool, contrivance” (see machine (n.)). The fem. is dea ex machina

Santa Claus (n.)

1773 (as St. A Claus, in “New York Gazette”), American English, from dialectal Dutch Sante Klaas, from Middle Dutch Sinter Niklaas “Saint Nicholas,” bishop of Asia Minor who became a patron saint for children. Now a worldwide phenomenon (Japanese santakurosu). Father Christmas is attested from 1650s.

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See the source image
weaver (n.)
mid-14c. (mid-13c. as a surname), agent noun from weave (v.). The weaver-bird (1826) so called from the ingenuity of its nests.
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rake (n.1)
“toothed tool for drawing or scraping things together,” Old English raca “rake,” earlier ræce, from Proto-Germanic *rak- “gather, heap up” (source also of Old Norse reka “spade, shovel,” Old High German rehho, German Rechen “a rake,” Gothic rikan “to heap up, collect”), from PIE root *reg- “move in a straight line,” with derivatives meaning “to direct in a straight line,” thus “to lead, rule” (source also of Greek oregein “to reach, stretch out,” Latin regere “direct, rule; keep straight, guide”), perhaps via its action, or via the notion of “implement with straight pieces of wood” [Watkins].


*leubh-
Proto-Indo-European root meaning “to care, desire, love.”
It forms all or part of: beliefbelievefurloughleave (n.) “permission, liberty granted to do something;” lemanlibidolieflivelonglovelovelyquodlibet.
It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit lubhyati “desires,” lobhaya- “to make crazy;” Persian ahiftan “to be tangled, be hit down, be in love;” Latin lubet, later libet “pleases,” libidolubido “desire, longing; sensual passion, lust;” Old Church Slavonic l’ubu “dear, beloved,” ljubiti, Russian ljubit’ “to love;” Lithuanian liaupsė “song of praise;” Old English lufu “feeling of love; romantic sexual attraction,” German Liebe “love,” Gothic liufs “dear, beloved.”
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Gretchen
fem. proper name, German diminutive of Greta, a German and Swedish pet form of Margaret. Sometimes used as a typical German female name, also sometimes in reference to the name of the simple girl seduced by Faust.


Faustian (adj.)
1870, in reference to Johann Faust (c. 1485-1541), German wandering astrologer and wizard, who was reputed to have sold his soul to the Devil. Fantastic tales of his life were told as early as the late 16c., and he was the hero of dramas by Marlowe and Goethe. The Latinized form of his name, faustus, means “of favorable omen.”
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raze (v.)
1540s, alteration of racen “pull or knock down” (a building or town), from earlier rasen (14c.) “to scratch, slash, scrape, erase,” from Old French raser “to scrape, shave,” from Medieval Latin rasare, frequentative of Latin radere (past participle rasus) “to scrape, shave,” possibly from an extended form of PIE root *red- “to scrape, scratch, gnaw.” Related: Razedrazing.
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“So that crazy guy had a name. A perfectly normal one. Kyle, for God’s sake . It made things worse because it made them more real.” (Page 796, 7+9+6=22, of ’11/22/63′ Copyright 2012 by Stephen King)

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About kylegrant76

Eye am that Eye am
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